Visiting Faculty Profile 2012-2018

Shigehiro Suzuki

Visiting Faculty

Professor Shigehiro (Shige) Suzuki is a full time faculty member in Villanova University’s Political Science Department.  Professor Suzuki is currently also a visiting faculty for the Center for Peace and Justice.  After graduating from Tokyo University, he entered the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs and worked at the Japanese Embassy at Nairobi, Kenya from 1994 to 1996. His responsibilities there involved monitoring and analyzing development and human rights situations in Uganda, Kenya, and Rwanda, and the aftermath of genocide. After briefly working for the Brookings Institution in DC, from 2000 to 2001, he worked at the Executive Director’s Office and the Office of the Emergency Program of the UNICEF in New York.  From 2002 to 2004 he also worked at the Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in the United Nations in NY. Throughout his stints at the Brookings Institution as well as the United Nations, Professor Suzuki tirelessly worked to protect and assist refugees and internally displaced persons who were affected by natural and human disasters.  In 2011, he served as executive director of Japan Platform, an NGO, working on relief efforts after the earthquake and tsunami that hit northern Japan. His research areas are the protection of and assistance to Internally Displaced Persons, and nuclear policies in Asia, specifically Japan.  At Villanova, Professor Suzuki has been teaching a variety of subjects including International Organization (United Nations), East Asian Politics, Refugees and Displaced Persons, Theories of War and Peace, International Relations, and American Foreign Policy.

Camille Burge

Camille Burge

Camille Burge is an Assistant Professor of Political Science. Before arriving at Villanova in the Fall of 2014, she received her MA and PhD from Vanderbilt University. From 2010 to 2013, Camille was a recipient of the prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.Her research interests lie at the intersection of political psychology and racial and ethnic politics. Specifically, she is interested in studying how we experience emotions as members of groups and how these experiences shape our political opinions and behavior. She is in the process of finishing her first book manuscript, Fired Up, Ready to Go: Pride, Shame, and Anger in African-American Politics, where she uses mixed methods to explore the political implications of African-Americans’emotional experiences. During her first two years at Villanova Camille was deeply involved in CPJE activities and is ecstatic about working more closely with individuals affiliated with the center especially on issues related to race, emotions, and gun control, and the relationships between global hip-hop and social justice.

Eugene Mc Carraher

Eugene McCarraher

Eugene McCarraher is an Associate Professor of Humanities.  He is currently the acting assistant director of the Honors Program, and recently completed two years as an Ann Quinn Welsh Fellow in Honors.  Before arriving at Villanova in 2000 he taught at Rutgers and the University of Delaware; he has also been a visiting instructor at Princeton.  In 2005-2006, he was a Charles Ryskamp Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies. His research interests include U. S. cultural, intellectual, religious, and economic history, as well as the relations among theology, politics, and economics. Based in the humanities department, where he teaches courses in culture and economics, politics and literature, and traditions of radicalism, he also teaches courses in modern U. S. history, the history of capitalism, and, for the Peace and Justice program, "Peace and Peacemakers."  In addition to publishing in scholarly journals, his book reviews and essays have appeared in Books and Culture,Commonweal, Dissent, the NationIn These Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Hedgehog Review, and Raritan.  His first book, Christian Critics:  Religion and the Impasse in Modern American Social Thought, was published by Cornell University Press in 2000; his second book, the manuscript of which he has just completed, will be entitled The Enchantments of Mammon:  Capitalism as the Religion of Modernity.  "Having had a long and happy informal relationship with CPJE, he looks forward to working more closely with colleagues and students there, focusing in particular on issues related to economics, technology, property, and utopian thinking."

James Wetzel

James Wetzel

Jim Wetzel holds the Augustinian Endowed Chair at Villanova University, where he is also a professor of philosophy. Prior to coming to Villanova in 2005, Dr. Wetzel taught for many years at Colgate University, a liberal arts college in Upstate New York. He has held visiting appointments at Notre Dame, Princeton, and Brown. His intellectual (and existential) interests lie at the intersection of philosophy and the religious life, and he has given a great deal of thought to the nature of philosophical piety and the peculiar expression that this piety takes in Augustinian Platonism. He has written three books on Augustine and Augustinian themes and edited a collection of essays on City of God. His teaching interests have taken him into SCI Graterford, where he has been regular presence in Villanova’s program there since the Spring of 2007, and into Bartley Hall, where he has taught VSB courses with his good friend and colleague, Ron Hill, a professor of marketing and business law and a recent faculty fellow at CPJE. A guiding ambition of Dr. Wetzel’s time at CPJE will be to consult with the regular faculty there about sharpening the focus of a projected new course, The Philosophy of the Social Venture, on peace and justice. This is a course whose design has so far been the collaborative work of visionary graduate students in philosophy and business. It is due to have its inaugural run in the Spring of 2015, where it will be taught by Drs. Wetzel and Hill on campus in VSB and conjointly at SCI Graterford. The basic ambition of the course is to offer a forum for attending to the ties between economy, social vision, and spiritual formation and thereby revisiting, in a community of unfixed possibilities, the true business of business.