Spring 2017 (Graduate)

NOTE: This list is currently tentative.

PHI 7710 - 001 Kant's Frist Critique: CRN: 31909

Days: W from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Instructors: Farshid Baghai
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason is a revolution in philosophical thinking. In this book, human reason makes itself its own project; it faces its own crisis and establishes self-criticism as the method for overcoming it. Studying major sections of this foundational text of critical philosophy, we aim to develop a solid understanding of its goal and structure.

 

PHI 8250 - 001 Merleau-Ponty CRN: 31910

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5 pm
Instructors: Thomas W. Busch
Comment:

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

We will read Phenomenology of Perception with an eye toward assessing its contribution to the development of phenomenology as well as its implications for an existential philosophy, centered on embodiment. Here we find his appropriation of gestalt psychology and Husserl, his dialogue with Sartre. We will read several essays in Signs where we can observe Merleau-Ponty coming to terms with structural linguistics and the social sciences and the development of an insipient communicative ethics. And we will read from The Visible and the Invisible to get a sense of his ontology of the “flesh” and what that might mean for the contemporary scene. We see him trying to overcome the limitations of the tradition of the philosophy of consciousness.

Books: Phenomenology of Perception, trans. Colin Smith (New York: Routledge)

            Signs, trans. Richard McCleary (Evanston: Northwestern)

            The Visible and the Invisible, trans. Alfonso Lingis         
            (Northwestern)

           Merleau-Ponty: Key /Concepts, Reynolds and Diprose, edit. 
           (Acumen)

Requirements: paper (12-15 pages); class presentation (centered on how philosophers have  responded to Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy)

PHI 8710 - 001 Virtue Epistemology CRN: 31911

Days: M from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm

Instructors: Stephen Napier

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance
 

The neuroscience of human cognition does not have flattering things to say about how we think or form judgments. Simply put, we are epistemically unjust (Medina, 2012). This is especially true for moral and political judgments. The course begins with an analysis of the contemporary neuroscience of moral and political judgments. This evidence prompts us to ask “How should we think/conduct our inquiry on moral/political matters?” More generally, we aim to answer “What does being epistemically just look like?” We begin our answer to the scientific evidence with selections from various standpoint feminist and virtue epistemologists (e.g., Little, Nussbaum, Murdoch, Zagzebski, et.al.) and cognitive scientists working on creativity and expertise (e.g., Holyoak, Sternberg, Weisberg, Amabile et.al). Our answer to the neuroscientific evidence, however, suggests that some people possess meta-lucidity (borrowing a concept from Jose Medina (2012)). This breaks loose our inquiry into the domain of social epistemology. Does being epistemically just require accepting moral testimony from the meta-lucid? What if we disagree? What if we have different interests at stake in our political inquiries?

PHI 8710 - 002 Nietzsche and Music CRN: 31912

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Instructors: John Carvalho
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


This seminar will consider together Nietzsche’s philosophy and music. We will treat Nietzsche’s remarks about music in general and the music of his time, and we will highlight the role of music in Nietzsche’s thinking in general, especially his thinking about the will to power. We will situate Nietzsche’s remarks about music in the context of the “music aesthetics” of his time – the writings of Hegel, Hanslick and Schopenhauer, the music of Wagner, Liszt and Bizet, the debate between formalism and feeling – and the philosophy of music of our time – starting with Wittgenstein and Adorno and including Peter Kivy, Jerry Levinson and Lydia Goehr. Principle texts by Nietzsche: The Birth of Tragedy, The Case of Wagner, Ecce Homo.

PHI 8710 - 003 SEM: Theory of Revolutions CRN: 31913

Days: R from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm

Instructors: Gabriel Rockhill
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

This seminar explores the modern and contemporary transformations in our political culture, understood as the practical mode of intelligibility that structures the very nature of politics by determining who qualifies as a political subject, what is visible as a political action, and how the spatio-temporal framework of politics is organized.  After a brief methodological and historiographical introduction, we will study the historical emergence of the modern concept of revolution and the transformations in the temporal horizons of the political due to the opening up of the future as an unknown field of utopian possibility.  We will examine, in this light, historical writings on various revolutions as well as theoretical attempts to conceptualize the specificity of revolutionary movements.  Against this historical backdrop, we will then explore what it means for a revolution to change social structure by discussing the reconfiguration of class relations as well as the role of gender and race in modern revolutions. This will allow us, more specifically, to examine the various accounts of agency used to explain revolutionary change, and we will be particularly interested in developing a non-reductive, multi-agential theory of social transformation. This methodological orientation will go hand in hand with a re-conceptualization of social norms as immanent, multi-tiered, dynamic, and therefore malleable.  Finally, after developing tools for a radically historicist and multi-agential approach to revolutions, we will conclude by examining the claim that there has been a shift in political culture from the grand era of revolutionary politics (roughly 1789 to 1968) to a purportedly post-revolutionary epoch (approximately 1968-present). More specifically, we will investigate the contemporary historical imaginary by asking whether or not the belief in an unprecedented future is a thing of the past.  Is such a future, in fact, a future past or a future afar (in the sense that revolutions, if they happen, occur far from the hegemonic centers of the Euro-American world)? If so, what are we to make of the recent revolutionary activity around the world, from Latin America to the entire Mediterranean region, the Occupy movement and beyond?  What is the status of revolutionary activity in the present, and does it require a reworking of the very category of revolution?

 

PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 31914

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8835-001 Independent Study II CRN: 31915

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 31916

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8875 - 001 Consortium II CRN: 31917

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation  CRN: 31918

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 31919

Days: TBA Location: TBA

Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020