Spring 2017 (Undergraduate)

NOTE: This list is currently tentative

PHI 1000-001, 006 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, MWF 10:30-11:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Rhodes Pinto

PHI 1000-002, 004 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, MWF 9:30-10:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Daniel Wood

PHI 1000-003 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor:  Jingchao Ma

PHI 1000-005, 007 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 9:30-10:20, MWF 10:30-11:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Ian Maley

PHI 1000-008, 010 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 11:30-12:20, MWF 12:30-1:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: David Mesing

PHI 1000-009, 011 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 11:30-12:20, MWF 12:30-1:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Katherine Kurtz

PHI 1000-012 Knowledge, Reality Self
MW 8:00-9:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Alan Pichanick

PHI 1000, 013-015  Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, MW 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor:  Morey Williams

PHI 1000-014, 016 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, MW 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Luis Salazar

PHI 1000-017 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: John-Patrick Schultz

PHI 1000-018, 023 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, TR 1:00-2:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skepitcal perspectives.
Instructor:  Bryant Rodemich

PHI 1000-019, 021 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 10:00-11:15, TR 11:30-12:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor:  Paul Smith

PHI 1000-020, 022 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 10:00-11:15, TR 1:00-2:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skepitcal perspectives.
Instructor: Christopher Drain

PHI 1000-024 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 10:30-11:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skepitcal perspectives.
Instructor: Jessie Dern-Sisco

PHI 1000-025 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 4:00-5:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Maria Cuervo

PHI 1000-100 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 6:00-7:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 1000-101 Knowledge, Reality, Self
R 6:10-8:50
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person.  Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Yannik Thiem

PHI 1000-102 Knowledge, Reality, Self
W 6:00-9:30  (Note: Fast Forward 4)
Instructor: Heather Coletti

PHI 1000-103 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 6:00-7:15
Instructor: Maria Cuervo

PHI 1000-H01  HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 1:00-2:15
Instructor: Julie Klein

PHI 1000-H02  HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 2:30-3:45
Instructor: John Doody

PHI 1000-H03  HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 10:00-11:15
Instructor: James Wetzel

PHI 2010-001 Logic & Critical Thinking
MW 4:30-5:45
In this course, we will study the nature of arguments and will develop skills to analyze and assess arguments. Specifically, we will study the difference between arguments, as reasoned discourse, and other discursive endeavors, analyze the components of arguments, and develop ways to distinguish between good and bad arguments. We will explore these issues through an engagement with informal and formal logic, deductive and inductive argument types, and philosophical issues related to argumentation.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 2020-001 Symbolic Logic
MW 1:30-2:45
Logic, parts of which form a branch of philosophy and parts of which form a branch of mathematics, is the study of reasoning.  Since arguments are the basic units of reasoning, logic is concerned with the analysis and evaluation of arguments. To distinguish correct from incorrect forms of reasoning, logicians have developed symbolic languages that capture the logical form of arguments. The goal of this skills-based course is to teach students the basic concepts and techniques of symbolic logic. We first work with the restricted language of ‘sentential’ logic, and then extend our inventory to ‘predicate’ logic. Students learn how to ‘translate’ English into our symbolic language, and how to draw correct inferences by constructing step-by-step proofs. Throughout the course, we keep in mind the intended application of symbolic logic to everyday reasoning as well as to classical and contemporary philosophical debates.
Instructor: Georg Theiner

PHI 2115-001, 003 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 10:00-11:15, TR 11:30-12:45
This course will expose us to contemporary philosophical and ethical problems arising in medicine and health care. Though some attention will be paid to “traditional” ethical problems such as abortion, euthanasia, and assisted suicide; the primary focus of the course throughout will be on ethical problems encountered in the clinical or research setting such as those arising in the context of organ donation, surrogate decision-making, research on human subjects, reproductive technologies, end-of-life issues, futility, managing moral distress, conscience protections for health care workers, cooperation in evil and others. In addition to understanding each issue fundamentally, a unified “picture” of the ethical delivery of health care will emerge. The overarching question that animates each issue is what does loving this patient/research subject look like? This class aims to make clinicians better at loving patients/subjects. 
Instructor:  Stephen Napier

PHI 2115-002 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 11:30-12:45
This course will expose us to contemporary philosophical problems in medicine and health care.  Through reading, critical reflection and classroom dialogue, you will learn to see yourself as part of a society that must take responsibility for its goals and uses of power concerning issues of life and death.  This course is geared toward future clinicians.  As such, we will pay close attention to the way that certain ethical dilemmas challenge health care professionals in particular.  This course will teach a method for ethics clinical case consultation.  Non-clinicians are welcome to take the course, but need to be aware of the professional focus of the readings and assignments. We will learn the philosophical basis from which to address and to discuss moral problems.  When relevant, we will explore the differences in approach to medical ethics between the philosophical and the theological.  Topics include: cultural competency, genetics, human experimentation, organ transplantation, physician-patient relationship, physician-nurse relationship, informed consent, end of life challenges, assisted-suicide, new reproductive technologies, and managed care
Instructor: Sarah Vaughan Brakman

PHI 2115-004, 201 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 1:00-2:15, TBA
This section of Health Care Ethics will deal with ethical issues embedded in clinical practice.  We will consider the ethical dimensions of clinical decision making, with special emphasis given to principles of biomedical ethics, the character of health care professionals, health-care-team interactions, interactions with patients and families, and narrative ethics. Specific topics will include issues surrounding death and dying, informed consent, truthfulness and confidentiality, abortion, reproductive technologies, research involving human subjects, and distribution of health care resources.
Instructor:  James McCartney, O.S.A.

PHI 2115-005 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 2:30-3:45
Instructor:  Marvin Lee

PHI 2117-H01 HON: The Good Doctor
TR 2:30-3:45
Medicine is an art as well as a science. The science is learned through study but the art must be learned through practice.  What are fundamental components of the art?  What are the habits of reasoning that lead to good diagnoses?  What are the virtues of the good doctor and what does it take to become one?  This course will focus on the culture of medicine, the acculturation process of becoming a doctor, and the analysis of what dispositional attitudes are necessary for the moral practice of medicine.  We will draw on resources from philosophy of medicine and moral theory, as well as sociological data and theory, along with first person medical narratives to explore answers to the questions above.
Instructor: Sarah Vaughan Brakman

PHI 2121-001 Environmental Ethics
MWF 10:30-11:20
This course is an introductory survey of established and emerging positions, arguments, and approaches in the academic field known as environmental ethics/philosophy. Accounts of the human-nature relationship as it has developed through western intellectual, cultural, and ecological histories will be explored through philosophical readings, non-fiction narrative, videos, cultural productions, and other mediums.  This course critically engages questions and issues regarding the ethical relationship between human beings and the natural world that we inhabit. Overarching questions posed throughout the term include:  how ought we behave toward, and interact with, the “more-than-human world”? How have the ideas we currently hold regarding beings and entities in nature emerged throughout western intellectual history? What ideas within western philosophical and theological traditions contribute to ecosocial crisis, and which ones carry the potential to forge healthy, sustainable, and just relations with the natural world?
Instructor: Albert Shin

PHI 2121-002 Environmental Ethics
MWF 11:30-12:20
Instructor: Kate Eltringham

PHI 2155-002 Engineering Ethics
TR 11:30-12:45
This course examines the field of engineering ethics through a series of case studies that raise questions about professional responsibility, the role of technology in society and the need for a more holistic evaluation of the purposes of science and engineering. Some of the issues to be discussed are the future of nuclear energy, climate change, the Challenger Shuttle Explosion, urban infrastructure development, weapons development and digital tools. The course requirements include a mid term exam, a group project, three shorter response papers and a longer paper based on the group project.
Instructor: Mark Doorley

PHI 2180-001, 100 Computer Ethics
TR 2:30-3:45, T 6:10-8:50
In this course, we consider the ways in which computers and allied technologies are changing or rendering uncertain our ideas about privacy, property, power, autonomy, responsibility, human culture and perhaps even human intelligence. We investigate the effects of technologically-driven change on the personal, professional, and civic behavior of individuals.  We also explore the effects of such change on social, legal, and political norms.  Specific cases studied include the Therac-25 accidents, the Challenger disaster, and problems with electronic voting.  We also discuss lessons learned from American and Soviet missile attack warning system failures, questions concerning the development and use of robotic weapons, and the role of information technologies in both planning and defending against terrorist acts.

We consider recent conflicts and emerging legal standards pertaining to privacy of personal information.  We will consider the subtle and not entirely intuitive link between surveillance and security of computer and communications systems. Classroom (and, possibly, panel) discussions treat ethical, social and legal aspects of software copyright, patent, and secrecy protection, as well as the controversy surrounding sharing of digital music and video files.  This year, our discussions will deal intensively with the controversies surrounding the prosecution of Aaron Swartz, and the revelations of Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden concerning the warrantless wiretapping of everyone’s communication (but not yours, right?)
Instructor: Dr. William Fleischman

PHI 2400-001 Social & Political Philosophy
TR 1:00-2:15
Marx famously claims that history repeats itself: first as tragedy then as farce. This course explores the theatrical staging of social and political life through figures such as Aristophanes, Machiavelli, Marx, Brecht, Genet, Kafka, Benjamin, Deleuze, and Žižek. A political system that perpetuates contradiction within our social life—alienating us from each other and ourselves—might be identified as tragic. Marx claims that a tragic stage of history must be overturned by a revolutionary comedy. We will read political philosophers of comedy as well as political comedies to explore contrasting models of political revolution and social reformation. We will specifically consider two forms of revolutionary comedy found in contemporary post-Marxist philosophy. Is revolution history’s shrill laughter that shatters a tragic stage of history? Or is the repeated failure of revolution history’s comic stutter through which tragedy repeats itself comically. Guiding themes: political affect, political satire, social performativity, historical repetition, and revolution. 
Instructor: Kate Eltringham

PHI 2410-001 Philosophy of Sex and Love
MWF 12:20-1:20
Embodiment, the nature of sexuality, the types of love, sexual ethics, marriage, sexual differences, and sexual discrimination. 
Instructor:  Albert Shin

PHI 2420-001 Philosophy of Women
MWF 9:30-10:20
In this course, we will explore the various schools, perspectives, and ideas of contemporary feminist thinkers. The materials are divided into four sections: in “oppression, objectification, alienation,” we discuss women’s social, philosophical, and political situations in the contemporary society; in “body and embodied experience,” we compare different thinkers on their approach to the experience of embodiment; in “subjectivity at intersectionality,” we explore the intricacies of the concept of subjectivity, especially in terms of women of color, feminist politics in different religions, sexuality, etc.; in the last section, “toward a new politics,” we examine the risks and opportunities of feminist politics in its various forms.
In this course, you will learn to:

  • Read important texts of feminist philosophy and locate them in their theoretical context and background;
  • Develop your understanding of intersectional feminism and understand how race, gender, sexuality, class, disability, etc. are systematically at work in oppression;
  • Apply feminist philosophical theories to a series of contemporary issues;
  • Write philosophical essays that engage with feminist philosophical concepts and contemporary issues.
    Instructor: Jingchao Ma

PHI 2450-001 Catholic Social Thought
TR 4:00-5:15
Catholic Social Thought (CST) rooted in the Christian narrative and developed over the last 135 years will present the Catholic teachings on the nature of social justice and its requirements.  CST will discuss the Catholic account of what it means to be human and of what we ought to be doing with our lives. This class will examine central principles of CST (e.g. human dignity, rights and responsibilities, the common good, the nature of the family,  the preferential option for the poor, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the dignity of work).  It will include a sustained critique and where applicable appreciation of views that shape, our culture such as Individualism, relativism, socialism, capitalism and the effects of technological advancement. 

We will read primary texts, found largely in the Papal encyclicals, secondary reflections, and evaluate contemporary social and economic challenges in order to demonstrate the richness of the CST tradition and its potential for finding a more promising way toward a society that embodies “justice for all.”
Instructor: Ronald Duska

PHI 2650-001 Philosophy of Sport
MW 3:00-4:15
This course will examine the role and nature of sports in human life and society. Current topics and issues will be explored.
Instructor: John Doody

PHI 2990-001 TOP: Philosophy of Economics
MWF 10:30-11:20
What is an economy? What is a market? What is money? Why do we value certain commodities and not others? This course explores the theoretical, political, and moral assumptions which have influenced the history of economics. Through a survey of the history of economic thought, we will come to understand how our collective ideas regarding what an economic system is changes in relation to changes in our politics, our social values, and our sciences. By considering the most influential ideas throughout the history of economics, the course will investigate how these ideas have come into dialogue and conflict with the changing political, sociological, and scientific transformations of their time. By exploring the history of economic thought in relation to its connection to philosophy, the course will ask us to question how the ideas we hold regarding human nature, society, and value shape our current economic institutions, and how these institutions shape our lives. 
Instructor: Charles Prusik

PHI 2993-001 Internship
TBA
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 3040-001 History of Early Modern Philosophy
TR 2:30-3:45
Philosophy 3040 is an intensive study of six key figures in seventeenth and eighteenth century European philosophy: Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, and Kant.  We will emphasize the variety of views and liveliness of debate in the period.  Looking at topics in metaphysics and epistemology, we will see that Descartes’ substance dualism is contested by Hobbes and Spinoza; Spinoza and Leibniz, while sometimes similar, disagree profoundly about the origins and order of the world; Hume rejects the entire project of Cartesian-Leibnizian rationalism in favor of empiricism; and Kant proposes to resolve the debate between rationalism and empiricism with what he calls a transcendental, critical philosophy.  Looking at topics in social and political philosophy, we will examine Hobbes’ and Spinoza’s respective accounts of human nature and political organization, and we will conclude the semester with Kant’s famous essay on history.  Philosophy 3040 has no formal prerequisites beyond Philosophy 1050.  Background in ancient and/or medieval philosophy is extremely useful. 
Instructor: Julie Klein

PHI 3160-001 History of Islamic Philosophy
TR 2:30-3:45
This course is an overview of Islamic philosophy, in which an intensive effort is made to survey the development, essential elements, major figures and impact of the field. It will present with clarity and in simple language a continuous narrative that strings together the historical and thematic evolution of Islamic Philosophy up to modern times, drawing a line between Islamic philosophy and non-Islamic influences, in particular, Greek sources, portraying the tension between Islamic philosophy and theology and illustrating the impact of the former on other trends of thought.
Instructor: Shams Inati

PHI 3992-100 Philosophy for Theology II
T 7:00-9:00 - Restricted to students in Augustinian Novitiate Program
Philosophy for Theology II is a two credit course which generally follows Philosophy for Theology I (a one credit course).  Philosophy for Theology II considers the influences that modern and contemporary philosophy have had on Christian theology in the last 500 years and the implications they have for Christian Theology today.
Instructor: James McCartney, O.S.A.

PHI 4140-001 Philosophy of Contemporary Music
TR  4:00-5:15
This course studies rock, rap, grrl/gurl and DJ music to understand the broad institutional forces, social and economic powers, practices and beliefs that make this music popular. The properly philosophical aspect of our study will involve defining what is musical about popular music.  The cultural theoretical aspect of our study will involve defining how pop, rock, rap, hip hop, riot, punk, and dance music contribute to the institutional forces which make it popular. In both studies we will privilege space over time, ethnography over history, imagination over the Law and simulation over autonomy. We will discuss the significance of contemporary music in terms of its dependence on commodity fetishism, its politics of resistance (somehow deeply rooted in nostalgia), its covert racism and sexism, and in terms of the reservoir of alcohol and drugs that fuels its cultural industrial production.
Instructor: John Carvalho

PHI 4825-001 Existentialism
MW 1:30-2:45
What is the meaning of our existence?
Whether we realize it or not, we respond to this question by the way we live our lives. Every day we find ourselves in a variety of circumstances where we need to make choices about how to relate to ourselves, how to be with others, and how to handle objects. But we cannot make such choices without making assumptions about the meaning of our existence, or about the goals in pursuit of which we enact that meaning. Our responses to the question of the meaning of our existence are initially and for the most part pre-reflective; we are often oblivious to our own indirect and implicit responses to the question. Focusing on selected sections of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time and Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity, this course reflects on how we produce meaning in our pre-reflective lives. In particular, we explore how we do so through relating to ourselves, to others, and to objects. We examine how such relations determine the meaning of our existence, shaping who we are, what we do, and how we do it. Instructor: Farshid Baghai

PHI 4990-001 Independent Study & Research
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 5000-001 SEM: Rights
MW 1:30-2:45
This advanced seminar will delve into the nature of rights in contemporary political theory.  We will focus especially on political rights and human rights.  With extensive reading of work by John Rawls, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Walzer, James Griffin, and Diana Tietjens Meyers, the course will explore the philosophical grounding for rights in the context of liberal democracies.  Students will research and write an extensive seminar paper in fulfillment of the research requirement for the major in philosophy. 
Instructor:  Sally Scholz

PHI 6000-001 Research Seminar
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz