Fall 2015 (Graduate)

Below is a listing of the Graduate classes being offered for Fall 2013. For information on specific times, days and instructors, please check  the Master Class Schedule on NOVASIS.


PHI 7340 - 001 Plato and Aristotle: CRN: 24081

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

This course will be an opportunity to think through the relationship between Plato and Aristotle on two interrelated and central themes.  The first is the thematic of life, body and nature.  The second is the theme of politics, soul and logos.  Walter Brogan will organize the first part of the course on Plato.  The seminar for this part of the course will emphasize Plato’s Phaedrus, sections of the Republic and the Statesman  In the second part of the course, on Aristotle, Helen Lang will consider the character of Aristotle's writing, focusing on the account of nature in Physics II, including how nature contrasts with art, and the relation of potency and actuality in Metaphysics XI. 

 

PHI 7910 - 001 Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit CRN: 24693

Days: MW from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Instructors: William J. Desmond
Comment: course dates: FF 8/24 to 10/2

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

The major purpose of this seminar is to read Hegel’s Phenomenology to get a sense of the work as a whole and the underlying dynamic and logic that inform it. It is a large and important work, considered by some to be one of the greatest works in the history of western philosophy. While we may not have time to discuss in detail all of it in class, students are asked to make an effort to read the text as a whole. In class we will look at some of the most important parts, with the following emphases:  First, simply trying to make sense of what Hegel is saying and what he intends. This means letting Hegel speak on his own terms.  Second,  formulating some sense of the development in specific parts, as well as of the movement of the work as a whole. Third, formulating some of the main questions  that arise in relation to Hegel’ s thinking in this work. This may mean raising questions in terms other than Hegel’s own.

Texts:

1. G.W.F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. A.V.Miller (Galaxy Books)
2. Jon Stewart (ed.), The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader (SUNY: 1997)
3. Wm Desmond, Hegel's God (Ashgate Publishers, 2003)

 

 

PHI 8120 - 001 Wittgenstein: Logic and Sanctity CRN: 24082

Days: R from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm

Instructors: James R. Wetzel

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Ludwig Wittgenstein is a big presence in the history of 20th century philosophy. The primary business of this seminar is to conduct a close reading of his two major works: Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations. Our broad focus will be on Wittgenstein’s abiding fascination with language, his eventual disillusionment with the notion of logical form, and his apparent trade of logical form for the enigmatic concept of "forms of life." We will also give select attention to two influential portraits of Wittgenstein in the secondary literature: Kripke’s inventively skeptical skeptic and Badiou’s anti-philosophical philosopher.

 

PHI 8350 - 001 Foucault CRN: 24083

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Instructors: John Carvalho
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Subjectivity and Truth

This seminar will follow the line of inquiry that led Foucault from the inaugural lectures at the College de France, in 1970-71, published under the title The Will to Know, and dedicated to ancient Greek judicial procedures, to his last lectures there, in 1983-84, published under the title The Courage of Truth, which ended before Foucault could deliver his final thoughts on the relation between the subject and truth in antiquity. Rather than attempt a broad survey of this long arc in Foucault’s thinking, we will pick up the thread in Foucault’s lectures from 1980-81 at the College and at the Université catholique de Louvain, published as Subjectivité et vérité and Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling, respectively. The change in Foucault’s thinking about the relation of the subject and truth was announced in the lectures, also given at the College, in 1979-80, published under the title On the Government of the Living. Our main texts, then, will be the lectures from 1979-81 with references, at the beginning and the end, to the lectures from 1970-71 and 1983-84 (including the lectures at UC Berkeley in 1983 published under the title Fearless Speech). (The hope is that Subjectivité et vérité will be translated by the time the seminar begins.)

 

PHI 8710 - 002 Collective Intentionality CRN: 24084

Days: R from 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Instructors: Georg Theiner
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

In this course, we survey contemporary treatments of collective intentionality. Situated amidst discussions of agency and intentionality in a social context, collective intentionality broadly refers to the kind of intentionality that allows people to experience, act, or think about something together, or as a group. Collective intentionality is manifested in a variety of phenomena. For example, joint attention is a basic form of intersubjective awareness of the world as perceptually available in the pursuit of shared engagements. Shared intentions allow people to carry out collaborative activities and tasks in a coordinated and cooperative manner. Collective acceptance is a key mechanism for the creation and maintenance of symbolic realities such as language, institutions, and power relations. Collective beliefs provide a common ground of normative commitments to regulate shared deliberative and evaluative practices. The power of collective emotions to fuel social conflicts, but also to unite people is evident from the history of mass gatherings, public rituals, and political movements. It is hard to exaggerate the extent to which collective intentionality permeates the social and cultural fabric of our lives. But what exactly does it mean to ascribe intentionality to people as a group – provided that collective intentionality is not just a shorthand for the ‘summative’ or ‘aggregate’ intentionality of individuals?

The distinctive focus of the philosophical analysis of collective intentionality rests on the conceptual, metaphysical, psychological, and normative features which underlie the joint or shared character of experiences, actions, and attitudes, and the related question of how these features help constitute the social world. The resurgence of interest in collective intentionality began in the late 1980s, and substantially expanded in the 1990s, thanks mostly to the pioneering work of John Searle, Margaret Gilbert, Michael Bratman, and Raimo Tuomela. Today, collective intentionality is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary area of philosophical research which draws on, and has left its mark on, social ontology and epistemology, phenomenology, psychology, linguistics, cognitive science, sociology, political science, economics, legal theory, and cultural and evolutionary anthropology. Our goal in this course is to compare and contrast leading theories of collective intentionality by delving into specific debates over the nature of joint attention, collective intentions and beliefs, collective acceptance and shared evaluative attitudes, collective emotions, collective knowledge and rationality, as well as collective agency and responsibility.

Readings

Michael Bratman (2013), Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together, Oxford University Press.
Margaret Gilbert (2013), Joint Commitment: How We Make the Social World, Oxford University Press.
Bryce Huebner (2013), Macrocognition: A Theory of Distributed Minds and Collective Intentionality, Oxford University Press.
John Protevi (2013), Political Affect: Connecting the Social and the Somatic, University of Minnesota Press.
John Searle (2010), Making the Social World, Oxford University Press.
Michael Tomasello (2014), A Natural History of Human Thinking, Harvard University Press.

Additional readings will be made available online.

 

PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 24085

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8835 - 001 Independent Study II CRN: 24086

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 24087

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8875 - 001 Consortium II CRN: 24088

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation  CRN: 24089

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 24090

Days: TBA Location: TBA

Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020