Fall 2016 (Graduate)


PHI 7340 - 001 TOP: Unworldly Itineraries: CRN: 22284

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: James R. Wetzel
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Philosophical ascents and descents refer to transformations of consciousness that bring either wisdom or mortal confusion. Our emphasis in this seminar is on the imperative of descent, of having to enter or return to a place of unknowing before true seeing can begin. And here the unknowing is less knowledge that is missing than wisdom that is undone—an art of disillusionment.  We begin with Plato’s policing of poetic inspiration in the Republic and end with Dante’s partitioning of philosophy from poetry in the weirdest part of hell.  Along the way we ponder the nature and depth of philosophy’s debt to poetic irony.  Core texts: Republic, Apology, Oedipus, Aeneid, Confessions, Golden Ass, Consolation of Philosophy, Inferno.

PHI 7640 - 001 Spinoza CRN: 22277

Days: T from 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Instructors: Julie Klein

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8710 - 001 SEM: Evil in German Philosophy CRN: 22279

Days: M from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Instructors: William J. Desmond

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

The problem of evil is a perennial one, but it is remarkable how evil arises as an issue in German philosophy at the height of its rationalist and idealist development. We associate Kant with a philosophy of rational autonomy wherein human self-determination is defended against all heteronomy, and yet at the end of his reflection radical evil arises as an ineradicable disposition of the human being. Evil as resistant to self-determination enters the heart of our project to be as fully self-determining as possible. Evil also cannot be avoided in the idealistic project of the rational self-determination of thinking. So we find in Hegel: he claims to make evil intelligible within the logic of his rational concept. However, even granting the relation of evil and self-determination, there seems something about evil that also is recalcitrant to our self-determination. In post-idealistic thought we find an intimation or foreboding of an kind of negative otherness recalcitrant to rational self-determination, and this enters into the heart of our sense, not just of the human being, but of the absolute itself.  This we find with Schelling and others.  How are we to think of evil? As intimately related to freedom? As only related to human freedom? As having implication for an ontological/ meontological sense of the evil of being? As immanent in God?  The foreboding of an immanent evil subsequently sets a kind of metaphysical tone for some important intellectual and cultural currents in Continental thought. We will look at such questions concerning evil in Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Reason Alone, Hegel’s Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion and Schelling’s Essay on Freedom.

Texts:

I. Kant, Religion and Rational Theology (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant, 1996) edited and translated by Allen W. Wood.

G.W. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, 1827, One volume edition, trans. Peter Hodgson, (Oxford University Press, 2006; reprint of the edition of University of California Press edition)

F.W.J. Schelling, Investigations in the Essence of Human Freedom, trans. Jeff Love (SUNY, 2007)

       

PHI 8710 - 002 SEM: Extended Mind CRN: 22280

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Instructors: Georg Theiner
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

To many people, it seems natural to conceive of the mind as a kind of ‘sandwich’ (Hurley) with cognition as the inner filling, wedged between action and perception. According to this model, mental states and activities are intimately tied to what’s going on inside the head, but only indirectly related to our bodies, our interactions with other people, and the world around us. In this course, we consider a loosely knit family of alternative approaches which study human agency and cognition as embodied, embedded, extended, and enacted (‘4E’) phenomena. In particular, we take as our focal point the ‘extended mind’ thesis, which asserts that our minds are ‘hybrid’ entities that emerge from the dynamic interplay between brains, bodies, and environmental resources such as symbols, tools, artifacts, cultural practices, norms, group structures, and social institutions.

PHI 8710 - 003 SEM: Politics of the Affect CRN: 22282

Days: R from 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

In light of the frequently high-pitched tone of politics, the seemingly increasing political polarization, and the oft-bemoaned loss of rational argument (alas, has politics ever been rational?), affect, emotion, and the passions become crucial dimensions for mapping and analyzing the contemporary political landscape. Taking up this thread, this course will examine different ways of accounting for the role and place of affect(s) in the constitution of the body politic. We will ask which affects come to be understood as political in what sense and how different accounts seek to grasp the materiality and motility of political experience.
 

Is there an affect of critique? What are the affects of political change? How do events, histories, facts, and myths sediment in the affective landscape over time? Looking not only at the changes in political sensibilities, but also in the means by which our affects are shaped, this course will pay particular attention to formulating a conceptual analysis of emerging media, their impact on the modes and tropes of communication, and their influence on shared sensibilities and practices of politics.To tackle this complex of questions, we will bring early modern political theory, early 20th-century German critical theory, and current political and queer theory into a constellation with each other.    

PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 22286

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8835 - 001 Independent Study II CRN: 22288

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 22289

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8875 - 001 Consortium II CRN: 22291

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation  CRN: 22293

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 22295

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020