Fall 2016 (Undergrad)

PHI 1000-001, 003 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, 9:30-10:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Luis Salazar

PHI 1000-002, 004 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, 9:30-10:20
Who or what are we?  Why are we here?  What is reality?  Can we know what is real, and if so, how?  Does God exist?  Why or why not?  Is this the only world?  What is the meaning of life?  Is there a meaning to life?  What are we to do?  What can we do?  Why?

This course will introduce students to some of the great thinkers of the Western philosophical tradition throughout the last two and a half millennia who devoted their lives and work to these questions.  Through an engagement with the thought and texts of these philosophers we will trace the historical development of philosophy in some of its major phases including Ancient philosophy, Medieval, Modern, and Contemporary philosophy.

The Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates is famous for the following saying: “The unexamined life is not worth living”.  In other words, for him, the examined life is worth living.  Does this mean that the philosophical life is worth living?  Is philosophy worth it?  This question: Is the philosophical life worth living? will serve as the guiding thread throughout our study of these philosophers.  Our goal will not be to find a simple yes or no answer to this question, but to learn how to engage the question itself through the great art of dialogue.

In light of this question and our study of these texts we will address the major themes of our course: knowledge, reality, and self.  We will examine the nature of philosophy itself and what it means to be a philosopher, what reality is and how it is known, the arguments for and against the existence of God, the problem of evil, whether the self exists, if it is mortal or immortal, and what it can or cannot know, whether life is meaningful or meaningless, and ultimately, of course, the question, “is the examined life worth living?”

There will be lecture, discussion, writing exercises, two short papers, a midterm exam, and a final exam.  Students will also have an extra credit opportunity to relate an assigned philosopher and his/her concepts to a film.  Additionally, at the end of the semester, we will have a friendly “group dialogue” assignment where students will give presentations on themes from some of the major philosophers from our course.
Instructor: Bryant Rodemich

PHI 1000-005, 006 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 9:30-10:20, 10:30-11:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Morey Williams

PHI 1000-007, 009 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 10:30-11:20, 11:30-12:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Katherine Kurtz

PHI 1000-008, 010 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, 11:30-12:20
In this course we will explore the three themes, knowledge, reality and self, in the history of philosophy, as indicated by the course title.  In particular, we will explore how the study of the nature and role of knowledge in human life is also a mode of self-examination.  We will read both ancient and modern philosophical texts and literary texts in order to ask: insofar as I can access reality only through my knowledge of the world and others, who am I?  What can I know and what am I not able to know?  How is knowledge of reality also self-knowledge?  This course investigates the ways that the pursuit of knowledge is also a mode of self-examination that can empower us, teach us the limits of our own capacities, and inform us about the responsibilities we have to others and the world.
Instructor: Ian Maley

PHI 1000-011, 029 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 1:30-2:20, 12:30-1:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Christopher Drain

PHI 1000-012, 030 Knowledge, Reality Self
MWF 12:30-1:20, MW 8:00-9:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Jingchao Ma

PHI 1000-013, 015 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 12:30-1:20, 1:30-2:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Daniel Wood

PHI 1000-014, 016 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF12:30-1:20, 1:30-2:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: David Mesing

PHI 1000-017 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 1:30-2:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Jessie Dern-Sisco

PHI 1000-018, 019 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Paul Smith

PHI 1000-020, 023 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, 10:00-11:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Sean Bray

PHI 1000-021, 025 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, 11:30-12:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Charles Prusik

PHI 1000-022, 100 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, W 6:10-8:50
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Elizabeth Irvine

PHI 1000-024 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 11:30-12:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 1000-026, 027 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 1:00-2:15, 2:30-3:45
In this course we examine problems related to knowledge, reality and the self.  The course emphasizes early to modern attempts to understand the relation between God and human beings and that of human beings to the world. During the earlier part of the semester we spend our time considering Christian responses. In the later half we turn our attention to Nietzsche, a philosopher who rejects these earlier approaches.
Instructor: Maria Cuervo

PHI 1000-028, 101 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 4:00-5:15, 6:00-7:15
Philosophy pertains to fundamental practices that are common to all human beings who seek to know themselves and the world they inhabit. Our knowledge, sense of reality and self are all formed and limited, in the first place, by the physical constraints of our bodies, and secondly by the cultural and historical conventions we are born into. This course aims at familiarizing students with some of the major questions and concepts involved in coming to know themselves and the world in order to help them acquire the tools necessary for carrying out their own philosophical engagements. Philosophers often do this by standing on the shoulders of giants and learning from the texts and perspectives of ancient and modern writers. Adopting this methodology, we will read selective texts by canonical authors such as Plato, St. Augustine, Descartes and Kant. We will also draw from contemporary writers and juxtapose their views with those of the canon.
Instructor: Emre Cetin Gurer

PHI 1000-031, 032 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, MW 4:30-5:45
What is knowledge? What is reality? What is a self?  No matter what we do and how we live, we are bound to answer these questions, often unconsciously. Without an idea of what counts as knowledge, we could neither understand nor evaluate the simplest of claims. Similarly, our beliefs about what things exist and what those things are like rest on assumptions about the nature of reality. And without a conception of selfhood, we could not perceive, let alone explain, our own and others’ qualities or behaviors. In short, all of us constantly and ineluctably respond to the questions about the nature of knowledge, reality, and selfhood. The key issue then is not whether but how we respond to them. In this course, we explore a number of major philosophical approaches to the question of knowledge, reality, and self. The goal is to facilitate a philosophical understanding of the assumptions that we make about ourselves, reality, and knowledge, and thus to enable a more informed engagement with how these assumptions are at work in our lives.  
Instructor: Farshid Baghai

PHI 1000-H01 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
M W 1:30-2:45
What is knowledge? What is reality? What is a self?  No matter what we do and how we live, we are bound to answer these questions, often unconsciously. Without an idea of what counts as knowledge, we could neither understand nor evaluate the simplest of claims. Similarly, our beliefs about what things exist and what those things are like rest on assumptions about the nature of reality. And without a conception of selfhood, we could not perceive, let alone explain, our own and others’ qualities or behaviors. In short, all of us constantly and ineluctably respond to the questions about the nature of knowledge, reality, and selfhood. The key issue then is not whether but how we respond to them. In this course, we explore a number of major philosophical approaches to the question of knowledge, reality, and self. The goal is to facilitate a philosophical understanding of the assumptions that we make about ourselves, reality, and knowledge, and thus to enable a more informed engagement with how these assumptions are at work in our lives.  
Instructor: Farshid Baghai

PHI 1000-H02 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 11:30-12:20
Instructor: Jessie Dern-Sisco

PHI 1000-H03 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 4:30-5:45
Instructor: James Wetzel

PHI 1000-H04 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 1:00-2:15
Instructor: Yannik Thiem

PHI 1000-H05 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 10:00-11:15
Drawing on an array of texts that surpass the standard ‘Western’ canon, this course will grapple with some of the most expansive and intimidating philosophic questions: What is the meaning of life? What is the nature of reality? Who are we? What—if anything—can we know? What is philosophy itself, and how might it help to elucidate some of these questions? In each case, we will approach these issues from multiple and diverse perspectives, often reframing or displacing them in order to reveal hidden philosophic assumptions.

Rather than seeking to find definitive closure or unanimous consensus, this seminar will cultivate a process of open-ended collective inquiry in which students will be encouraged to think autonomously and challenge facile solutions. The material covered will include ancient, Christian, modern and contemporary sources, as well as texts from beyond the canonized—and largely white, male, middle-class, European—history of philosophy. This will allow us to critically reflect on the deep-seated presuppositions of particular cultural traditions, while engaging with radically different practices of philosophic interrogation. Students should come away from the course with an expanded sense of theoretical possibilities, as well as an arsenal of critical tools for developing creative and rigorous thinking.
Instructor: Gabriel Rockhill

PHI 2010-001 Logic & Critical Thinking
TR 10:00-11:15
In this course, we will study the nature of arguments and will develop skills to analyze and assess arguments. Specifically, we will study the difference between arguments, as reasoned discourse, and other discursive endeavors, analyze the components of arguments, and develop ways to distinguish between good and bad arguments. We will explore these issues through an engagement with informal and formal logic, deductive and inductive argument types, and philosophical issues related to argumentation.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 2010-002 Logic & Critical Thinking
TR 1:00-2:15
Instructor: Stephen Napier

PHI 2115-001 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 2:30-3:45
Rights and duties of the patient/client and the members of the health care team, death and dying, genetic engineering and manipulation.
Instructor: Stephen Napier

PHI 2115-100 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
Distance Learning
Rights and duties of the patient/client and the members of the health care team, death and dying, genetic engineering and manipulation.
Istructor: Terry Maksymowych

PHI 2121-001, 002 Environmental Ethics
TR 2:30-3:45, 4:00-5:15
The relation of the physical and biological environment to ethical values. Priorities among environmental, economic and political values as a basis for ethical decisions.
Instructor: Chaone Mallory

PHI 2170-001 Mass Media Ethics
MWF 10:30-11:20
How does the media shape our social interactions?  Are privacy or security still possible in the age of the internet?  Are there ethical rules that ought to guide our interactions online?  What can we expect from our “friends,” “links,” “pins,” and other online communities? This course uses principles and values such as privacy, security, freedom, community, and avoidance of harm to guide a discussion of ethics and standards of mass media.  Our focus will be on the internet but students interested in broadcast journalism, film, theatre, and other forms of mass media will find much to excite their interests shape their decision-making.  
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 2300-100 Philosophy of Law
MW 6:00-7:15
Philosophy of Law will analyze taken-for-granted terms such as "responsibility" and "rights" as they apply to legal theory. Discussion about actual court cases will show students the beauty of argument (that is, how arguments can work or fail to work depending on how they're constructed) and bring to life the importance of understanding the broader philosophical concepts behind the law.
Instructor: Heather Coletti

PHI 2420-001 Philosophy of Women
MW 3:00-4:15
In this course, we will explore the various schools, perspectives, and ideas of contemporary feminist thinkers. The materials are divided into four sections: in “oppression, objectification, alienation,” we discuss women’s social, philosophical, and political situations in the contemporary society; in “body and embodied experience,” we compare different thinkers on their approach to the experience of embodiment; in “subjectivity at intersectionality,” we explore the intricacies of the concept of subjectivity, especially in terms of women of color, feminist politics in different religions, sexuality, etc.; in the last section, “toward a new politics,” we examine the risks and opportunities of feminist politics in its various forms.
Instructor: Jingchao Ma

PHI 2450-001 Catholic Social Thought
MWF 11:30-12:20
Catholic Social Thought from Rerum Navarum to the present. Its Aristotelean-Thomistic grounding. The Church’s challenge to analyses of contemporary social, political, and economic systems.
Instructor: Daniel Regan

PHI 2990-H01 TOPICS: Ethics and the Family
Of Blood, Love, and the Ties that Bind: Ethics and the Family
TR 10:00-11:15
This course explores social and medical ethical issues that families confront in the beginning and end of human life. It engages philosophical moral sources and other interdisciplinary sources to reflect on 1) competing conceptions of the grounding of parenthood, 2) competing obligations within and among families, 3) the meaning of human dignity in relation to inter-generational justice, 4) the normative weight of ethnic and racial identity for the formation of families, and 5) the state’s obligations to protect the family’s right to self-determination while also promoting the common good. Topics include:  adoption (both traditional and embryo), assisted reproductive technologies (ART), state and federal policy regulations regarding both adoption and ART services, human reproductive cloning, and filial obligations for long-term care of the elderly.
Instructor: Sarah Vaughan Brakman

PHI 2993-001 Internship
TBA
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 3020-001 History of Ancient Philosophy
TR 11:30-12:45
Philosophy appeared in Athens around the 800 B.C.E, composed in poetry because writing had not yet been invented. Philosophers ask what does it mean to say we know something and what, exactly, is it that we know? What is happiness and what makes us desire happiness? Around the 500B.C.E. writing begins and the debates concerning these questions become a cornerstone of European culture. In this course we consider these debates about problems in human experience.
Instructor: Katherine Eltringham

PHI 3030-001 History of Medieval Philosophy
TR 2:30-3:45
Philosophy 3030 surveys medieval philosophy in the Christian, Islamic, and Jewish traditions.  We shall consider each tradition on its own terms and also study the ways texts and issues cross traditions.  All of the texts we shall study exhibit the encounter of monotheism and revelation with the corpus of Greek and Roman philosophy and science.  We will pay special attention to relationship of philosophical speculation and revealed teachings by studying three major themes: the interpretation of texts, the nature of the human soul and its perfection, and arguments for the existence of God.
Instructor: Julie Klein

PHI 3991-100 Philosophy for Theology I
W 7:30-8:45 (Restricted to students in the Augustinian Novitiate Program)
The purpose of this course is to show the relationships between Philosophy and Christian Theology, We will discuss how philosophy assists theology, how philosophy challenges theology, how theology challenges philosophy, and finally how philosophy sometimes ignores theology and vice-versa.
Instructor: James McCartney, O.S.A.

PHI 4150-001 Philosophy & Film
TR 11:30-12:45
This course provides an expansive introduction to film history and fundamental issues in the philosophy of film and the arts. Students engage in close analysis of major cinematic works and, with the aid of key philosophic texts, unpack and unravel the deep theoretical issues at stake in these works.
Instructor: Gabriel Rockhill

PHI 4610-001 Philosophy of Mind
MW 1:30-2:45
The aim of this course is to engage students in contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind. The course is divided into four segments.  In the first segment, which lays the foundation, we survey a variety of attempts to solve the ‘mind-body’ problem.  In the second segment, we consider the ‘self-model’ theory of subjectivity as a framework for studying conscious experience, the phenomenal self, and the emergence of the first-person perspective.  In the third segment, we challenge the assumption that mind and consciousness are confined inside the boundaries of the brain, and learn about alternative approaches that highlight the embodied, embedded, extended, and enactive (‘4e’) character of cognition. In the last segment, we deal with the question of whether machines can think, and ponder how the possibility of creating artificial forms of ‘superintellligence’ might affect our future.
Instructor: Georg Theiner

PHI 4900-100 Feminist Theories
T 6:10-8:50
Feminist theory explores some of the cutting edge contributions of what has been called the most important social movement of the 20th century.  Feminist epistemology, social theory, politics, and philosophies of language have transformed what counts as philosophy. 
Instructor: Chaone Mallory

PHI 4990-001 Independent Study & Research
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 5000-H01 HON: Religion in Continental Philosophy
MW 1:30-2:45
Religion was held by some thinkers to be something which modern humanity would outgrow, but to the surprise of many religion has proved to offer enduring significance in the human being’s quest for meaning. Religion has not only returned to public importance with political repercussions, but there has been a return of significant interest in religion in contemporary Continental philosophy. The dimensions and the significance of this (re)turn to religion will be the focus of this seminar. We will explore a representative sample of thinkers who diversely represent this turn in contemporary Continental thought. We will pay attention to difficulties that have arisen in post-Enlightenment modernity concerning the question of God, looking at the background of how the issues came to be importantly formulated by thinkers like Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche. It will concern itself with how these issues continue to be reformulated in contemporary Continental thought in thinkers like Heidegger, Levinas, Marion and others. These thinkers will also be brought into dialogue with the outlook developed by the instructor in God and the Between
Instructor: William Desmond

PHI 6000-001 Research Seminar
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz