Fall 2017 (Undergraduate)

NOTE: This list is currently tentative

PHI 1000-001 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Ian Maley

PHI 1000-002, 005 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20, 9:30-10:20
Instructor: Katherine Kurtz

PHI 1000-003 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 8:30-9:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Jingchao Ma

PHI 1000-004 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 9:30-10:20
Instructor: Emre Cetin Gurer

PHI 1000-006, 013 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 9:30-10:20, 12:30-1:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Daniel Kraemer

PHI 1000-007 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 12:30-1:20 (Restricted to Transfer Students, cross-listed with ACS 1000-102)
Instructor: Jessie Brooke Dern-Sisco

PHI 1000-008, 010 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 10:30-11:20, 11:30-12:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Bryant Rodemich

PHI 1000-009, 012 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 11:30-12:20, 12:30-1:20
Instructor: Jared Bly

PHI 1000-011, 014 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 12:30-1:20, 1:30-2:20
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Daniel Cunningham

PHI 1000-015, 018 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Jasmine Wallace

PHI 1000-016, 020 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Rhodes Pinto

PHI 1000-017, 019 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15, 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Delia Popa

PHI 1000-021 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Ashley Vaught

PHI 1000-022, 033 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, 11:30-12:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Maria Cuervo

PHI 1000-023, 024 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 8:30-9:45, 10:00-11:15
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Charlie Prusik

PHI 1000-025, 026 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 10:00-11:15, 11:30-12:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Christopher Drain

PHI 1000-027, 028 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 1:00-2:15, 2:30-3:45
Instructor: David Mesing

PHI 1000-029 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 2:30-3:45
Instructor: Julie Klein

PHI 1000-030 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 4:00-5:15
Instructor: Luis Salazar

PHI 1000-031 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15
Instructor: John Carvalho

PHI 1000-032 Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 4:30-5:45
An exploration of philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of the human person. Readings explore the dialogue on these questions between Catholic/Christian responses and secular and skeptical perspectives.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 1000-100 Knowledge, Reality, Self
T 6:10-8:50
Instructor: Hande Kesgin Esen

PHI 1000-101 Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 6:00-7:15
Instructor: John Karas

PHI 1000-102 Knowledge, Reality, Self
R 6:00-9:30 p.m. (Note: Fast Forward 1, Distance Learning)
Instructor: Katherine Filbert

PHI 1000-H01 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 1:30-2:45
Instructor: James Wetzel

PHI 1000-H02 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 10:30-11:20
Instructor: Jessie Brooke Dern-Sisco

PHI 1000-H03 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MW 3:00-4:15
Instructor: Farshid Baghai

PHI 1000-H04 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
TR 4:00-5:15
Instructor: Yannik Thiem

PHI 1000-H05 HON: Knowledge, Reality, Self
MWF 11:30-12:20
Instructor: Ian Maley

PHI 2010-100 Logic & Critical Thinking
MW 6:00-7:15 p.m.
In this course, we will study the nature of arguments and will develop skills to analyze and assess arguments. Specifically, we will study the difference between arguments, as reasoned discourse, and other discursive endeavors, analyze the components of arguments, and develop ways to distinguish between good and bad arguments. We will explore these issues through an engagement with informal and formal logic, deductive and inductive argument types, and philosophical issues related to argumentation.
Instructor: Amrit Heer

PHI 2115-001, 002 Ethics for Health Care Professionals
TR 11:30-12:45, 1:00-2:15
This course will expose us to contemporary philosophical and ethical problems arising in medicine and health care. Though some attention will be paid to “traditional” ethical problems such as abortion, euthanasia, and assisted suicide; the primary focus of the course throughout will be on ethical problems encountered in the clinical or research setting such as those arising in the context of organ donation, surrogate decision-making, research on human subjects, reproductive technologies, end-of-life issues, futility, managing moral distress, conscience protections for health care workers, cooperation in evil and others. In addition to understanding each issue fundamentally, a unified “picture” of the ethical delivery of health care will emerge. The overarching question that animates each issue is what does loving this patient/research subject look like? This class aims to make clinicians better at loving patients/subjects. 
Instructor: Stephen Napier

PHI 2115-003 Ethics for Health Care Prof.
TR 2:30-3:45
Instructor: Marvin Lee

PHI 2115-201 Ethics for Health Care Prof.
Distance Learning, Fall II
Must be enrolled in one of the following Campuses: University Alliance
Instructor: Terry Smith Maksymowych

PHI 2121-001, 002 Environmental Ethics
MWF 10:30-11:20, 11:30-12:20
This course will explore ethical questions which concern the physical and biological environment, including analysis of competing priorities among environmental, economic and political values.  We will examine the theoretical underpinnings of our ethical choices as well as specific issues and dilemmas related to the environment, its preservation, provision, and threats to its continued sustainability.
Instructor: James M. Murdoch, Jr.

PHI 2160-001 Ethics of War
MWF 12:30-1:20
This course will look at some of the normative and practical issues of war.  We will address ethical issues facing citizens, combatants, states, and the international community.  Although just war theory will receive some primacy, other theoretical approaches to war will also be considered including realism and pacifism.  Our study will include war, terrorism and responses to terrorism, preventive war, genocide, crimes against humanity, military intervention, security, cyber-warfare, and uninhabited aerial vehicles, among other related topics.  Students will be challenged to connect theoretical discussions to current events and encouraged to read both national and international news sources.  Students will also be invited to participate in the Ethics of War Conference at West Point, a joint conference between Villanova and the US Military Academy.
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 2400-001 Social and Political Philosophy
MWF 11:30-12:20
Social and political philosophers and the influence of their theories on the philosophical foundation of modern culture and society; emphasis on such conceptions as society, the state, justice and equality, and the social and political nature of persons.
Instructor: Emre Cetin Gurer

PHI 2410-100 Philosophy of Sex and Love
W 6:10-8:50
In this course, we’ll explore the difference between sex and gender; the difference between love and friendship and the components of an ideal partner; the complexities of love and friendship; parent/motherhood; and the motivation that compels us to complete or avoid caring labor in personal and intimate relationships.  Contemporary feminist philosophy and interdisciplinary Women’s Studies materials will comprise the bulk of the reading.
Instructor: Heather Coletti

PHI 2420-001 Philosophy of Women
MWF 9:30-10:20
In this course, we will explore the various schools, perspectives, and ideas of contemporary feminist thinkers. The materials are divided into four sections: in “oppression, objectification, alienation,” we discuss women’s social, philosophical, and political situations in the contemporary society; in “body and embodied experience,” we compare different thinkers on their approach to the experience of embodiment; in “subjectivity at intersectionality,” we explore the intricacies of the concept of subjectivity, especially in terms of women of color, feminist politics in different religions, sexuality, etc.; in the last section, “toward a new politics,” we examine the risks and opportunities of feminist politics in its various forms.

In this course, you will learn to:

  • Read important texts of feminist philosophy and locate them in their theoretical context and background;
  • Develop your understanding of intersectional feminism and understand how race, gender, sexuality, class, disability, etc. are systematically at work in oppression;
  • Apply feminist philosophical theories to a series of contemporary issues;
  • Write philosophical essays that engage with feminist philosophical concepts and contemporary issues.

Instructor: Jingchao Ma

PHI 2450-001 Catholic Social Thought
TR 4:00-5:15
Catholic Social Thought (CST) rooted in the Christian narrative and developed over the last 135 years will present the Catholic teachings on the nature of social justice and its requirements.  CST will discuss the Catholic account of what it means to be human and of what we ought to be doing with our lives. This class will examine central principles of CST (e.g. human dignity, rights and responsibilities, the common good, the nature of the family,  the preferential option for the poor, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the dignity of work).  It will include a sustained critique and where applicable appreciation of views that shape, our culture such as Individualism, relativism, socialism, capitalism and the effects of technological advancement. 

We will read primary texts, found largely in the Papal encyclicals, secondary reflections, and evaluate contemporary social and economic challenges in order to demonstrate the richness of the CST tradition and its potential for finding a more promising way toward a society that embodies “justice for all.”
Instructor: Ronald Duska

PHI 2710-001 Information, Knowledge, Inquiry
TR 10:00-11:15
Beliefs have consequences - witness Hitler, but also Mother Theresa. What we believe about what is good, about any meaning in life, and about a host of other things, radically affects how we live. Beliefs are some of the most important things we have. The overarching question animating this course is this: "what should I believe?" This features as one of the more important of any philosophical question. We shall ask and attempt to answer various sub-question: how should I conduct inquiry on controversial issues? Do certain social factors such as economic privilege affect how I think and what I believe? If so, how can I moderate those effects? What psychological factors (e.g., confirmation biases) affect how I think? How can these be moderated? Answering these questions will be the aim of the course.
Instructor: Stephen Napier

PHI 2990-002 TOP: Latin American Philosophy
TR 2:30-3:45
This course aims to introduce students to a number of philosophical issues and problems that arise in Latin American thought. We will look at the ways in which the Latin American context shapes and informs the activity of philosophy. Our point of departure will be the encounter between the Spanish and the Natives in 1492 and our focus will be mainly on the social and political issues that arise on account of the conquest, slavery, colonialism, post-colonial nation-building, racism, poverty, and dependency. 
Instructor: Luis Salazar

PHI 2990-003 TOP: Yoga & Philosophy
TR 8:30-9:45 a.m.
This course will introduce yoga’s ten fundamental tenets for living a good life. We will read a broad selection of literature on the topics of non-violence, truthfulness, non-stealing, moderation, non-possessiveness, purity, contentment, zeal, self-study and surrender to a higher power. In each class we will practice about 30 minutes of yoga, as a yoga mat is a powerful laboratory on which we can begin to explore these concepts. Students will be challenged to apply our theoretical discussions and reading to incidental and significant moments in their own lives. A yoga mat is required.
Instructor: Amy Dolan

PHI 2993-001 Internship
TBA
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 3020-001 History of Ancient Philosophy
TR 11:30-12:45
This is a course that will focus on the origins of Western thinking.  We will begin with the earliest writings in ancient Greece. We will study Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides and Democritus as examples of early Greek thinking.  We will then turn to Plato and a study of two of his major works, The Republic, still considered one of the great classics of literature and political philosophy in the West and The Symposium, his famous dialogue on love.  Finally we will study parts of Aristotle’s Physics, Metaphysics and Ethics, works that still today are formative for our culture.  The theme of the course will be the importance of original thinking and the foundational importance of Greek culture for the Western tradition and culture.
Instructor: Walter Brogan

PHI 3030-001 History of Medieval Philosophy
TR 1:00-2:15
Philosophy 3030 surveys medieval philosophy in the Christian, Islamic, and Jewish traditions.  We shall consider each tradition on its own terms and also study the ways texts and issues cross traditions.  All of the texts we shall study exhibit the encounter of monotheism and revelation with the corpus of Greek and Roman philosophy and science.  We will pay special attention to relationship of philosophical speculation and revealed teachings by studying three major themes: the interpretation of texts, the nature of the human soul and its perfection, and arguments for the existence of God.
Instructor: Julie Klein

PHI 3050-001 Kant & 19th Century Philosophy
MW 1:30-2:45
Human Reason: Powers and Plights — Studying Immanuel Kant, Mary Shelley, Georg Hegel, Søren Kierkegaard, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche, in this course, we explore how reason can be at once a source of human power and human plight. Kant shows how the power of reason to ask why questions – a power that is essential to the functioning of reason – can entangle reason in questions that it can neither dismiss nor answer. Shelley tells the story of how, even in its most powerful moments, reason cannot command consequences. Hegel reveals how reason acquires and sustains its power in negating itself. Kierkegaard illustrates how the abstracting power of reason inclines to make us devoid of passion and character, and renders our age the age of advertisement and immediate publicity. Marx describes how the rationalization of economy in capitalism increases economic efficiency and wealth while impoverishing human social relations by shaping them after the model of economic exchange. Nietzsche depicts how our pursuit of ideals through rational self-denial tends to lead the human psyche and human culture into a deep crisis regarding the value and meaning of life. 
Instructor: Farshid Baghai

PHI 3991-100 Philosophy for Theology I
Days & Time: TBA
Restricted to students in the Augustinian Novitiate Program
Instructor: James Wetzel

PHI 4610-001 Philosophy of Mind
MW 1:30-2:45
The aim of this course is to engage students in contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind. The course is divided into four segments.  In the first segment, which lays the foundation, we survey a variety of attempts to solve the ‘mind-body’ problem.  In the second segment, we consider the ‘self-model’ theory of subjectivity as a framework for studying conscious experience, the phenomenal self, and the emergence of the first-person perspective.  In the third segment, we challenge the assumption that mind and consciousness are confined inside the boundaries of the brain, and learn about alternative approaches that highlight the embodied, embedded, extended, and enactive (‘4e’) character of cognition. In the last segment, we deal with the question of whether machines can think, and ponder how the possibility of creating artificial forms of ‘superintellligence’ might affect our future.
Instructor: Georg Theiner

PHI 4990-001 Independent Study & Research
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz

PHI 6000-001 Research Seminar
TBA - Permission of Chair Required
Instructor: Sally Scholz