Spring 2015 (Graduate)

Below is a listing of the Graduate classes being offered for Spring 2015. For information on specific times, days and instructors, please check  the Master Class Schedule on NOVASIS.

PHI 7620 - 001 The Rationalists: CRN: 34097

Days: R from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: Julie Klein
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance
We will study Descartes and Spinoza and then turn to Leibniz’s critical reactions and proposals.  Our focus will metaphysical and epistemological.  Major issues will include God/Substance/Nature, mind-body relations, truth, and the status of science.  In addition to the primary sources, we will also read recent theoretical literature on the practice of the history of philosophy (e.g. historical reconstruction, contextualism, “presentism,” hermeneutic) and recent major scholarship on our three figures.  Our initial method will be contextualist: attention to questions of inheritance and appropriation; textual transmission and the early modern republic of letters; relations to contemporaneous science, politics, and theology; and issues of language.

Major texts:
Cottingham et al.  The Philosophical Writings of Descartes (3vol)

Shapiro, ed. and tr. The Correspondence between Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia and Rene Descartes

Spinoza, Principles of Cartesian Philosophy; Ethics; select correspondence

Garber and Ariew, ed. and tr. Leibniz: Philosophical Essays

Articles and Chapters to be posted on Blackboard

Requirements: Seminar Participation
Two ten page papers or one 20 page paper


PHI 8250 - 001 Merleau-Ponty: CRN: 33347

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: Thomas Busch
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

We will read Phenomenology of Perception with an eye toward assessing its contribution to the development of phenomenology (particularly his relationship to Husserl and Sartre) as well as its implications for an existential philosophy, centered on embodiment. We will read several essays in Signs where we can observe Merleau-Ponty coming to terms with structural linguistics and the social sciences and the development of an insipient communicative ethics. And we will read from The Visible and the Invisible to get a sense of his ontology of the “flesh” and what that might mean for the contemporary scene.

 Books: Phenomenology of Perception
           Signs
          The Visible and the Invisible
          Merleau-Ponty: Key /Concepts
(Reynolds and Diprose, edit.)

Requirements: a paper and a class presentation.

 

 

 

PHI 8710 - 001 SEM: Plato & Aristotle on Impulse, Desire, and Inclination
CRN: 33348

Days: W from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Instructors: Helen Lang

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

We engage in actions and enter into relations, both with ourselves and other objects, animate and inanimate, through impulses, desires, and inclinations. Plato and Aristotle raise serious questions about these “drives”: are they too in some sense rational or are they irrational? Are impulse, desire, and inclination intimately concerned with body or are they separate – where the rubber meets the road of the mind/body relation? How are the affects that they produce different from those we experience when we “know” something? In this course we shall consider the metaphysical underpinnings of topics often thought to be political and at the same time ask how the political is itself a foundation for metaphysics.

PHI 8710 - 002 Film after Deleuze CRN: 33349

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
Instructors: John Carvalho

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Speaking about cinema, Gilles Deleuze famously said, “The brain is the screen.” What does that mean? What does that mean since Deleuze also says the brain is the unity or the interval between philosophy and cinema, thought and images? And where do we find this “brain screen?” Is it in our heads, in the molecular circuits and links formed by cinematic stimuli on the brain? Or is it in the world, the world on which the perceptions traced by those brain circuits depend for their meaning? Or is it both at once, “dialethic,” as Patricia Pisters, following Robert Pepperell, argues?

In this seminar, we will test these options with a strong preference for situating the brain screen in the world. This preference will involve us in discussions of Stanley Cavell, Alva Noë and Graham Priest as well as Henri Bergson, Deleuze, Pepperell and Pisters. Following Deleuze, we will not attempt a theory ‘about’ cinema “but about the concepts that cinema gives rise to and which themselves are related to other concepts corresponding to other practices” (C2 280). As a result, situating the brain screen in the world will lead us to consider an enactive model of the mind as well as the possibilities for an enactive cinema.

PHI 8710 - 003 SEM: Critique in Borderlands CRN: 33350

Days: M from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Instructors: Gabriel Rockhill
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


This seminar will explore questions of complex cultural geography and radical politics in a global perspective by using the lens of specific figures of critique as they engage in various ways with the borderlands of mainstream ‘Western’ thought and practice. The notions of ‘figures’ and ‘borderlands’ will be used in a broad sense, allowing us to concentrate not only on individuals but also on collective forms of criticism, not only on geographic frontiers but also on liminal and alternative spaces within the same geographic location. We will, in this light, explore such issues as the meaning and historical constitution of the ‘West’ (with an eye to the problematic assumption that philosophy is prototypically ‘Western’); contemporary debates on post-colonialism, de-colonialism, and subaltern studies; the politics of race and space; sexual politics outside the Atlantic world; philosophical anthropology and the possibility of a geography of being that takes into account ‘non-western’ ontologies; and revolutionary politics beyond the Euro-American master narratives. Our trajectory, which will be much more episodic and rhizomatic than linear, will lead us from such figures of critique such as Zetkin in the Kremlin and Gramsci in prison to Fanon in Africa, C.L.R. James in Haiti, Castoriadis in the streets, Foucault in the Iranian Revolution, Chakrabarty in India, and Viveiros de Castro in Amazonia. The seminar will thus seek to open and explore new horizons of radical political geography, not simply by looking elsewhere, but by critically interrogating the very socio-cultural formation of categories such as ‘elsewhere’ and ‘otherness.’

 
PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 33351

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8835 - 001 Independent Study II CRN: 33352

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 33353

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8875 - 001 Consortium II CRN: 33354

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation  CRN: 33355

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 33356

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Yannik Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020