Intro Level Core Courses

HON 1000, 1003, 1005 Interdisc I

John Doody (PHI)
Paul Danove (Theology)
Heidi Rose (W 3:00 - 3:50)

MWF 10:30-12:20pm

HON 1000, 1003, 1005
INTERDISC I: PHILOSOPHY, THEOLOGY, THEOLOGY, HUMANITIES
JACK DOODY, PAUL DANOVE, HEIDI ROSE
MWF 10:30-12:20, W 3:00-3:50

HON 1000- Doody

Description: An intensive introduction to Philosophy as it originated in the Ancient World with primary focus on Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Augustine.

Objectives: Learning the use of reason, logical argumentation and the ability to read difficult primary sources. Developing critical thinking skills.


HON 1003-Danove
As an integral part of the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, this foundational course on the Gospels of Mark, Luke, and John introduces students to the rich living tradition of Christianity: its New Testament sources, traditions, practices, and major thinkers that have shaped Christianity’s response to the fundamental human questions that underlie all religions and shape the human search for meaning. With a particular focus on Roman Catholicism, students engage Christianity as a living tradition of beliefs and practices that have developed over time in local and global cultural and religious contexts and that, loyal to the living God to which they point, are ready to be transformed again. Students also engage Christian truth-claims, themes, values, and witness as resources for analyzing and critically evaluating 1st Century Greco-Roman and contemporary cultural challenges. In this course, students are equipped to appreciate the ongoing quest of Christian faith seeking understanding as it enters into conversation with all human knowledge and experience, including other faith traditions.

HON 1005- Rose

In this course students are introduced to the fundamental relationship between text and performance, and between literature and speech. Ancient Greece gives us a context from which to examine: 1) the stories we tell and both why and how we tell them, 2) how theatre developed, and 3) the power of performance in human life and society. The analysis of character, language, myth, image, rhythm, form, style, and culture is grounded in studying what makes these texts inherently theatrical, how they spoke to the audiences of their time, and how they continue to speak to contemporary audiences. The texts are experienced from page to stage. Prior performance experience is not at all necessary--only a love of language and literature, openness to exploring different parts of yourself, imagination, and some hard creative and intellectual work!

 

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HON 1007-001 Interdisc Humanities III

James Ijames
R 4:00-5:15PM

Course description forthcoming.

 

 

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ACS 1000-H01 Ancients

Thomas W. Smith
MWF 12:30-1:20PM

Restricted to Honors students in the GTB Cohort

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Plutarch, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H02 Ancients

Kevin Hughes 
MWF 12:30-1:20PM

Restricted to Honors students in the GTB Cohort

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Plutarch, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H03 Ancients

Eugene McCarraher
MWF 12:30-1:20

Restricted to Honors students in the GTB Cohort

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Plutarch, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H04 Ancients

MARY HIRSCHFELD
MWF 12:30-1:20

Restricted to Honors students in the PPE Cohort 

Course description, forthcoming.



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ACS 1000-H05 Ancients

Mary Hirschfeld
MWF 1:30-2:20pm 

Restricted to Honors students in the Business & Society Cohort. 

This ACS seminar is designed for Honors students in the Villanova School of Business. The guiding question of our semester is Augustine’s own: “Who am I, and what am I?” We will investigate together what it means to be human, not merely as an academic exercise, but in order to understand ourselves better as people and as members of our communities, whether familial, social, or religious. Together, we will read Homer’s Iliad, sections of the Holy Bible (Genesis, Exodus, and the Gospel of Luke), Saint Augustine’s Confessions, and Dante’s Inferno, along with excerpts from Plutarch’s Lives, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, and the Qur’an. Each of these texts has something important to teach us about our own search for self-understanding, and about what makes life meaningful. You may be surprised to find yourself transformed in the process—and, in turn, your ideas about work and leisure, friendship and solitude, humanity and God, your present and your future. Vibrant seminar discussions will also prepare you to think critically, to read closely and carefully, and to write and speak persuasively.  

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H06 Ancients

GREGORY HOSKINS
MW 1:30-2:45

As a Foundational Course in the Core Curriculum, the seminar is designed to accomplish three goals: to introduce you to university-level reading, writing, and seminar participation; to raise one of the four Core questions, “Who Am I?;” and, to introduce you to pre-modern (= “Ancient”), and especially to Augustinian, texts and themes. We take as our models of an engaged scholar St. Thomas of Villanova (1486-1555) who combined a love of learning with a life of service to others, especially to the poor, and St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430) who sought after truth with “heart and voice and pen.” The seminar is founded on the belief that seeking the truth (veritas) with respect and love (caritas) toward one another leads to deep and lasting community (unitas).

As a component of the Honors Society & Human Behavior Cohort we will give special attention in our seminar to three intimately related questions. Because the social sciences seek to explain human behavior, we will ask, “What motivates human behavior?” And, because our actions can only be properly understood within the context of the attempt to live a good life, we will ask, “What is a life well lived?” The third question we will attend to is directly related to these questions and to the theme of your sophomore seminar: What is (social) justice? A concern with justice is intrinsic to the desire to live a life worth living. You’ll be challenged by several distinct and conflicting accounts of human behavior and human flourishing. The purpose of doing this is to help you to think more deeply and carefully about these questions.

Fall 2018 Possible Reading List:

Aeschylus: Oresteia [The Libation Bearers; The Eumenides]
Plato: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito
Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (selections)
Epictetus: Enchiridion (Manual for Living)
Hebrew Bible: Exodus (selections), Amos
New Testament: Gospel of Luke
Augustine: Confessions
Dante: Inferno

Restricted to Honors students in the Society & Human Behavior Cohort

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ACS 1000-H07 Ancients

CATHERINE STAPLES
TR 8:30-9:45

Close reading and discussion of selected texts from the time of Homer through the English Renaissance. In this seminar you will learn to read closely and with care. Weekly journals, free-writing and mark-ups of the text will help you to refine your own critical and sometimes creative responses to the reading. Writing will be intensive, with emphasis placed on revision and on the discovery of a process which works best for you as an individual writer. As many of the works we study have oral origins, we’ll begin with a close look at a narrative that’s come down to us through purely oral channels, weighing memory, imagination, and cultural intention. Our readings will be close and full good inquiries. Whether we are contemplating Achilles’ rage, the spiritual journeys of Augustine and Dante, or “the unstable fictions of gender” in Shakespeare—we will explore the impact of narrative choices, imagery, word choice, and tone. Plan on lively discussion and active daily participation. Course texts will include Homer’s Iliad, Augustine’s Confesssions, Dante’s Inferno, Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, and Shakespeare’s As You Like It as well as poetry by Sappho, Erinna, Alkaios, Simonides and other ancient lyric poets. The class includes a trip to Philadelphia Museum of Art as well as a movie night.

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ACS 1000-H08 Ancients

MICHAEL THOMPSON
MWF 9:30-10:20

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the intellectual life and spiritual values found within the traditions of the western humanities. The essential question posed by the humanities is “What does it mean to be human?” The central question posed by this ACS honors seminar is “Who am I?” In many ways there is no viable and plausible response for the former without resolving the latter. In New & Collected Poems 2001, the poet Czeslaw Milosz claims that the purpose of poetry is to remind us how difficult it is to remain just one person. We will attempt to address the concept of “person” and “Who Am I” through reading, studying and discussing some of the central works of the Western humanities tradition. We will be guided in our task by the insights of the Christian theologian and philosopher St. Augustine of Hippo. St. Augustine claims that you are confronted with the choice of becoming whoever you are to be. This choice can be ignored but its consequences cannot be avoided. The focus of our seminar’s presentations will concern interpretations of the nature and meaning of this choice. Choosing who you are concerns relationships between the development of individual identity, truth, and the influences of those factors which you cannot easily change, or not at all, in your life, such as family, codes of expected behavior, the implications of transgression and the force of contextual circumstances.
We will use the concepts of tragedy, transgression, resistance and what is thought to be “natural” to differentiate the classical Greek and Roman beliefs concerning human nature from those of the monotheistic traditions of Judaism, and Christianity. We will trace the concepts of individual motives and honor in Homer’s Iliad (excerpts) and Sophocles’ Antigone. We will evaluate the peculiar transgressive individuality of Socrates in Plato’s Apology. We will address the Roman interpretation of human nature through the poetic vision of Virgil’s Aeneid, (excerpts). We will find in the Torah’s Genesis and the New Testaments Gospels of Mark and Matthew and St. Augustine’s Confessions that transgression equates with sin which is the product of real choices and conceptually quite different from the Greek/Roman notions of tragic destiny. Each ancient tradition has articulated different interpretations for human identity, honorable behavior, tragedy and transgression. We will analyze a range of these concepts within the contexts of these intensely quarrelsome, competitive and brutal life-worlds of pre modernity. We will emphasize the implications of these concepts from both the Augustinian perspective and contemporary application. We will read the great medieval classic Dante’s Inferno, and finish the semester with the proto- modern preamble Prince by Machiavelli. If we have time we will address some central issues within the Qur’an plus the commentary from Sayid Q’utb’s, In the Shade of Qur’an, a major modern intellectual inspiration for the Jihadist Muslim Brotherhood, al Qaeda and the Islamic State.
The format for our seminar will be, primarily, student commentary, with discussion of texts and text assigned questions, On Fridays there will be a weekly discussion session. I will lecture, periodically.

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ECO 1001-H01 Intro to Micro

MICHELE CASARIO
MW 1:30-2:45

Course description, forthcoming.

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EGR 1200-H01 EGR: INTERDISCIPLINARY PROJECT

ANDREA WELKER/ NOELLE COMOLLI
TR 1:00-2:15

An introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of engineering utilizing entrepreneurially minded learning. Required class for and restricted to students enrolled in Honors Engineering.

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EGR 1200-P7H Refugee Camp

ANDREA WELKER/ BRYAN ENSLEIN/ VIRGINIA SMITH
T 6:10-8:50

Refugee camps require properly designed systems to ensure delivery of sufficient services to its temporary inhabitants. This class will utilize Geographic Information Systems in exploring water, power, and other basic needs for these camps.  Required class for and restricted to students enrolled in Honors Engineering

 

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HIS 1165-H01 HON: SUFFERING AND THE PROGRESS IN THE 20TH CENTURY

MICHAEL WESTRATE
TR 3:00-4:15

This course examines the political, cultural, social, and economic development of the world from the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05 to the present. Through lectures, discussions, readings (both primary and scholarly), visual art, music, and movies, we will investigate two key themes: suffering and progress. The twentieth century was a time of extraordinary suffering—concentration camps, war, genocide, famine, forced migration, and other evils plagued humanity throughout the century. At the same time, substantial progress was made in the areas of quality of life and equality for all. Throughout the semester, we will learn about some of the worst of the suffering; we will also follow the progress of life expectancy, literacy, and equality for all, as well as major advances in technology. Via weekly written assignments, discussion, and a semester-long research project, our goal will be to assess the importance of these and other subjects in today’s world. At the end of the semester, we will better understand “the fundamental interconnectedness of all things,” or (to put it another way), human webs—the networks that make up our reality.

 

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PHI 1000-H01 Knowledge Reality Self

FARSHID BAGHAI
TR 2:30-3:45

No matter what you do and how you live, you are bound to develop beliefs about who you are. You make conscious and unconscious assumptions about what your ‘real’ or ‘ideal’ self is. But who are you? What makes you, you? This course examines some of the major philosophical approaches to the question of the self. We also explore how the responses that we give to this question influence and shape our life, our relation to reality, and our ways of knowing reality. The primary goal of the course is to facilitate a more reflective understanding of yourself, and thus a more informed engagement with yourself, with others, and with the world around you.

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PHI 1000-H02 Knowledge Reality Self

YANNIK THEIM
MW 4:30-5:45

In this class we will tarry with some of the big philosophical questions: What is the meaning of life? How do social norms shape, limit, and enable our sense of the world and ourselves? What—if anything—can we know? By what criteria can we distinguish knowledge from, for example, opinion? What is the nature of reality? Why is that an important question to ask in the first place? What is philosophy, and how might we use it in encountering these questions?

Rather than trying to settle on definitive answers, this seminar will cultivate a process of open-ended collective inquiry in which students will be encouraged to think autonomously and challenge facile solutions. The material covered will include ancient, Christian, modern and contemporary sources, as well as texts from beyond the canonized—and largely white, male, European—history of philosophy. Taking multiple perspectives will allow us to reflect critically on the assumptions that we inherit through our own traditions and that remain largely invisible to us. Students should come away from the course with an expanded sense of theoretical possibilities, as well as an arsenal of critical tools for developing creative and rigorous thinking.


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PHI 1000-H03 Knowledge Reality Self

JOHN CARVALHO
TR 4:00 -5:15

Rather than providing a selective survey of the history of philosophy or undertaking an analysis of the various and distinct ways philosophy has been studied and practiced in the West since the time of the ancient Greeks, this course will explore possible answers to questions philosophers have asked from ancient times to the present, namely, how is knowledge of the world and ourselves possible, and how do we know that we know?

These questions bring together a healthy skepticism B How do I know? B and a robust epistemology B How do I know? B which are trademarks of what we call Philosophy. The centrality of these questions for Philosophy makes them appropriate for an introduction to this subject. The active testing, in class discussions, of reasons for accepting or rejecting answers to these questions introduces students to the practice of philosophizing. This practice includes an evaluation of the answers proposed as they might be realized in our own lives and the lives of others.

The specific goal of this course is to position the classical Greek and Christian philosophical traditions in relation to contemporary problems in the philosophy of mind. Setting anchor in the 17th century separation of the mind B which knows what is true B from the body B which is the source of error, we establish the classical Greek and Christian foundations for this view and explore some 20th and 21st century claims for a more seamless connection between the mind, the body and the environment which challenge that view. In this context, we consider how discipline makes bodies the sites of knowledge and truths that delimit what it is permissible to know. What might we know were we to successfully reject that discipline? In the course of this exploration, students learn to master the art of making and evaluating arguments in their abstract articulation as philosophical theories, in the flesh as they might be realized in our experience generally, and in their concrete expression in the lives of individual human beings.

TEXTS (titles with publishers and ISBNs are available for purchase in the bookstore)

Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett ISBN 0872201929)
Augustine, The Teacher (Hackett ISBN 0872202127)
Plato, Five Dialogues (Hackett ISBN 0872200760)
Jean-Paul Sartre, AIntentionality,@ (Blackboard)
Maurice Natanson, APhenomenology and Existentialism@ (Blackboard)
Maurice Merleau-Ponty, The Phenomenology of Perception, selections (Blackboard)
Iris Young, AThrowing Like a Girl@ (Blackboard)
Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (Vintage ISBN 0679752554)
Luce Irigaray, This Sex Which is Not One (Cornell 0801493315)
James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (Vintage Books ISBN 0679744726)

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PHI 1000-H04 Knowledge Reality Self

WALTER BROGAN
MW 3:00-4:15

In this course, we will study some of the great authors of the history of philosophy such as Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Marx, and Freud. Among the philosophical areas we will cover will be: philosophical principles about reality, foundations of just law, principles of morality, theories of knowledge, theories about the ideal society, proofs for God's existence, etc. Since it is a core course, we will focus on developing an understanding of the methods and aims of philosophical thinking. A basic question we will ask is, "What does it mean to be political and rational beings? What is the ideal community for human beings? The seminar-style class will aim to encourage sharing ideas and insights and expect that each of us will seriously confront the texts and ideas we encounter.

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PSC 1100-H01 HON: American Goverment

MATTHEW KERBEL
TR 8:30-9:45pm

This foundational political science course explores the structures and functions of American government so that we might understand the relationship between politics and policy, and how the theoretical basis of the American political system matches up against the way the process works in practice.  Our overarching question will be whether and why we should care about American democracy and invest in making it work.  We will begin our exploration by examining the Constitution, federalism, and other defining "ground rules" of the American political system, and consider how we become political creatures, how our opinions may or may not resonate in the political process, and how we are connected to that process through such institutions as the mass media, political parties, elections, and interest groups.  We will then consider the primary institutions of American government — Congress, the presidency, the executive branch, and the Courts — and how effectively they produce domestic and foreign policy while protecting our rights and liberties.  We will read a mix of primary and secondary source materials, popular items from newspapers, blogs and social media, and an interactive textbook published by the instructor.  Coursework will include a mix of objective assessments and original writing.

 

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PSC 1200-H01 International Relations

LANCE KENNEY
TR 1:30-2:15pm

This course is an introduction to the study of international relations (IR), a distinct academic discipline that involves elements of political science, history, economics, sociology, and philosophy. The aim is to present the key concepts, theories, and paradigms that shape and influence world politics. Simply reporting on contemporary international events is NOT the goal: evaluating and critically assessing those events IS the goal.

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PSY 1000-H01 HON: General Psychology

REBECCA BRAND
TR 11:30-12:45pm

Course description, forthcoming.

 

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THL 1000-H01 Faith Reason and Culture

ANTHONY GODZIEBA
TR 8:30-9:45

This course studies the basic elements of the Christian faith tradition and their connection to our contemporary context, using the method of critical theological reflection.

How should we approach this introductory course? It’s hard to know because of three important factors: the participants all have varying backgrounds and attitudes with regard to religion; a course on religion or Christian theology taught within the university is probably different from any other study of religion that the participants have ever done; and our contemporary Western culture, which is the context for our study and which is made up of so many diverse factors and interests, argues many times against the meaningfulness of those same religious realities that we want to examine in this course.

Any theology course which doesn’t take these points into account is doomed even before it starts. To have a productive course, then, it may look as though we have to handle just about everything. But we only have a semester, and we can handle only a limited number of topics. I would suggest these as a way to gain insight into the basic issues:
(1) a brief diagnosis of contemporary Western culture, looking especially at its relationship to religious experience and to Christianity in particular;
(2) an examination of the character and tasks of Christian theology;
(3) a study of the biblical Jesus, and the ethical effect that Jesus has on the lived experience of those who commit themselves to discipleship (following Jesus and the God of Jesus);
(4) a study of some of the basic faith claims of Christianity (the nature of faith and revelation, the Christian doctrine of God, salvation/redemption/liberation, the Christian view of the human person), along with selected contemporary applications, showing how these claims relate to everyday lived experience, with its social, political, and economic concerns.

The course requirements are personal and active presence at all class sessions, one research assignment (between 2 and 4 printed, double-spaced pages in length), one class presentation, two interim tests (first quarter and third quarter of the course), a mid-term exam, and a final exam.

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THL 1000-H02 Faith Reason and Culture

GREGORY GRIMES
TR 1:00-2:15

Based upon the Christian notion that God became human in Jesus of Nazareth, who intimately interacted with the people of his own time, addressing their needs, this course begins by diagnosing characteristics of contemporary culture. In short, asking: what are the most urgent needs of our time? We will then explore how an understanding of God as Creator and our relationship to God as creatures in a created world provides an ultimate orientation for how we are to live in the world today. Here we will explore a thoroughly Augustinian understanding of the God/human relationship. Then this will be related to Pope Francis’s encyclical, “Laudato Si’”, which addresses quite concretely how this understanding of the God/human relationship is of the utmost importance for the ecological, economic, and social challenges we currently face as a society. From here we will delve more deeply into an understanding of Jesus: who he was, how he thought of himself in relationship to God, the central message of his ministry, and the importance of Christians carrying out that ministry today. Having examined more closely both God and Jesus, we will apply this more specifically to the question: how can Christianity improve our ways of thinking of and implementing more just economic systems that encourage sustainable, integral human development?

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THL 1000-H03 Faith Reason and Culture

KEVIN DEPRINZIO
TR 10:00-11:15


What is Faith? What is Culture? And can dialogue between the two be reason-able? As an integral part of the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, this foundational course introduces students to the rich living tradition of Christianity, a tradition that in its roots is about this essential dialogue and whose aim is to respond to the fundamental human questions that underlie religion and shape the human search for meaning. With a particular focus on Roman Catholicism, students will engage Christianity as a living tradition of beliefs and practices that have developed over time. Students will also engage Christian truth-claims, themes, values, and witness as resources for analyzing and critically evaluating contemporary cultural challenges.
One of the hallmarks of Augustine’s contribution to theology is his concern for oneness of mind and heart, which he used not only to form his own community of friends modeled on the Christian community found in the Acts of the Apostles, but to construct the basis of his pastoral ministry. This course will attend to this concern for integration of material and for integration of mind and heart and will employ a variety of instructional methods that will help the student better engage and be engaged by the course. And so, there will be lecture, facilitated class discussion, online assignments and group work.

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THL 1000-H04 Faith Reason and Culture

ILIA DELIO
T 4:00-6:30

This is a foundational course and an integral part of the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the rich living tradition of Christianity including the sources, traditions, practices, and major thinkers that have shaped Christianity’s response to the fundamental human questions that underlie religion and shape the human search for meaning. Students will engage Christianity as a living tradition of beliefs and practices that impact personhood and worldview. Students will also engage Christian core beliefs, themes, values, and witness as resources for analyzing and critically evaluating contemporary cultural challenges. A fundamental aim of the course is to appreciate the ongoing quest of the Augustinian theme, faith seeks understanding, as we enter into conversation with a range of human knowledge and experience, including other faith traditions, secularization, ecology and modern science.

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THL 1000-H05 Faith Reason and Culture

IAN CLAUSEN
MW 3:00-4:15

At the start of Confessions 10, Augustine offers up this prayer: “Let me know you, O you who know me; then shall I know even as I am known” (10.1.1). Echoing a few verses taken from the Apostle Paul, Augustine’s prayer gives us a sense of what is involved in the work of theology: it is a knowing, yes, of the hidden divine life – “faith seeking understanding” (fides quaerens intellectum); but it is also a coming-to-know of ourselves “before God” (coram Deo). It is a journey that at some point might bring us to say – as Augustine dares to say, and even dares us to say – that God is “more intimately present to me than my innermost being” (3.6.11), and that “I could more easily have doubted that I was alive than that truth exists” (7.10.16).

Not your average textbook study of God, surely! But also not your average modern apathy towards religion, which haunts all our attempts to speak of God with integrity. In this course, we shall wrestle with that context and more as we seek to uncover the resources and gifts of the theological tradition (especially Catholic and Augustinian). We shall contemplate the idea that the question of God is not only or primarily a what-question but a where-question: “where is God?” but also “where am I?,” since we always do theology from somewhere in the world. “Whither shall I go from thy Spirit?,” the Psalmist asks. “Or whither shall I flee from thy presence?” (Ps. 139:7, RSV). If God is the ground of the possibility of being, there is literally no place we can be where God is not.

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Villanova University
Garey Hall 106
800 Lancaster Ave.
Villanova, PA 19085
Phone: 610.519.4650
Fax: 610.519.5405