Upper Level Electives: Arts

CRM 4000-H01 HON: DELINQUENCY PREVENTION

ALLISON PAYNE
MWF 10:30 - 11:20

Course description, forthcoming.

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HON 3600-001 ENG: MODERNIST MANIFESTO

MEGAN QUIGLEY
TR 10:00-11:15

What were writers at the beginning of the 20th century so angry about? What is a manifesto and why did this type of writing become so popular after the First World War? To answer these questions, this course will examine both the literary works and the manifestos of writers such as Karl Marx, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, Filippo Marinetti, and D. H. Lawrence. In The Communist Manifesto Marx and Engels proclaim that “All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned,” while the Manifesto of Futurism declares, “We intend to sing the love of danger, the habit of energy and fearlessness.” These vibrant proclamations aimed to scorch the earth, and we will aim to discover what literary, social, and philosophical traditions these writers wished to blast away. Finally, we will also determine the ways the literary works incorporate their authors’ ideals to, as Ezra Pound announced, Make it New!

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HON 4800-001 THL: SHAPING AN ADULT LIFE

ANNA MORELAND
MW 4:30-5:45

Course description forthcoming.

 

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HON 5100-001 THE: PERSONAL IDENTITY & Am Musical

VALERIE M JOYCE
TR 10:00-11:15

Course description forthcoming.

 

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HON 5700-001 PSC: JUSTICE SEMINAR

PETER BUSCH
TR 10:00-11:15

This course is a semester-long investigation of political justice.  We begin with Aristotle’s Politics, the work of classical philosophy that is also a practical guide for citizens and statesmen. We will ask questions like these:  Who should rule, and for what purpose?  How to judge the rival claims made for oligarchy, democracy, and aristocracy, the regimes concerned with wealth, freedom, and virtue?  The second half of the course turns to modern republics. Why did statesmen like James Madison think that justice is best served by representative government, separation of powers, individual rights, and commerce? Our text will be a book that was required reading for the American founders: Montesquieu’s Spirit of the Laws.

Restricted to students in the PPE Cohort.

 

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HON 5700-002 SOC: SOCIAL JUSTICE SEMINAR

KELLY WELCH
TR 1:00-2:15

 This seminar begins with students critically analyzing components of just societies and implications of social justice—or absence thereof—in light of the work of various moral, political, and social scholars and philosophers. We will examine global dynamics of social justice in relation to specific groups categorized according to race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, immigration status, age, or "otherness." Both interpersonal and institutional inequalities will be addressed. Using sound social scientific methodology, this class will encourage students to understand different perspectives about the basic elements of just societies, critically assess the nature of international societies from the perspective of social justice, consider various proposals on how to advance social justice, and evaluate a specific issue in the context of proposing reform and increasing equality and justice for all.  

Restricted to students in the Society & Human Behavior Cohort.

 

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HUM 2900-001 VOCATION OF THE CHILD

MICHAEL TOMKO
TR 10:00-11:15

“The child is the father of the man” wrote the Romantic poet William Wordsworth. The claim is that childhood experience crafts our adult selves, an insight that helps to explain the intensity of our contemporary debates about reforming education or improving parenting. But do we know what type of adults we want our children to raise? Exploring assumptions about the human person that frame our current approach to children, we will consider developments that either reduce the child’s intellect to a marketable utility or neglect to envision any form of the good life. We will also gain a clearer understanding of what goods we seek in children and in ourselves and how best to pursue those goods, drawing on the philosophical insights of Josef Pieper and Abraham Heschel, the theologically-informed teaching theories of Sofia Cavelleti and Maria Montessori, the writings on childhood by Wordsworth, Robert Frost, and W.E.B. DuBois, and the classic work of children’s literature, The Secret Garden.

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PHI 2117-H01 HON: THE GOOD DOCTOR

SARAH VAUGHN BRAKMAN
TR 2:30-3:45 PM

 

Course description, forthcoming.

 

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THL 2550-H01 HON: THEMES MODERN CHRISTIANITY: VATICAN II TO POPE FRANCIS

MASSIMO FIGGIOLI
MW 1:30-2:45

This course examines the Second Vatican Council in its historical background, its unfolding, and its legacy in contemporary Roman Catholicism.

The first part of the course analyzes the history of Vatican II in its pre-history (theological movements in the early 20th century), announcement and preparation (1959-1962), and unfolding until its end December 1965.

The second part of the course analyzes the most important final documents approved by Vatican II on ecclesiology (Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes), revelation (Dei Verbum), liturgy (Sacrosanctum Concilium), religious liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), ecumenism (Unitatis Redintegratio), and inter-religious relations (Nostra Aetate). These documents will be read in the context of a more plural and global contemporary Catholicism in dialogue with non-Catholic Churches, non-Christian religions, and modern culture.

The third part of the course focuses on the first fifty years of application/reception of Vatican II in terms of theological debate on the major issues debated and left open by Vatican II. Special attention will be devoted to the relationship between Vatican II and the pontificate of Pope Francis as the first pope who did not take part in any capacity in Vatican II.

The main goals of the course:

·      Know what Vatican II is and its importance in the history of Christianity, of Catholicism, and in global history;

·      Acquire an historical understanding of the development of theological and religious ideas and specifically of the development of the Catholic theological tradition;

·      Comprehend contemporary Catholicism from the perspective of the theological trajectories between Vatican II and today in the sense of recognizing the deep mutual relations and tensions between Catholic theology and the other dimensions of the human experience (culture, science, politics).

 

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Villanova University
Garey Hall 106
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Villanova, PA 19085
Phone: 610.519.4650
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