Cultural Film & Lecture Series

The cultural film series celebrates the 175th anniversary of Villanova University by featuring films that examine the Augustinian themes found in the seal of the university: Truth, Unity, and Love.

Films are screened in the Cinema of the Connelly Center on Villanova’s campus on:

  • Sundays at 3:30 pm and 7:00 pm
  • Mondays at 7:00 pm.

Audience members are encouraged to buy dinner at the Connelly Center before the screening.  Food and drink are also allowed in The Connelly Cinema during the screening of the fil

The Cultural Film Series features speakers who bring expertise about the films.  These speakers are chosen because they can enhance the viewing experience for members of the audience. The speakers, who introduce the film and lead a discussion after the screening, are only present for the Monday evening screenings.

As always, all screenings are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Dr. John O’Leary at john.oleary@villanova.edu, or by calling (610) 519-4454.

FALL SEMESTER

Oct. 1, 2      THE CONVERSATION--- USA, 1974, 113 minutes. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola.
                    SPEAKER: Rick Worland

                    Critic Brian Holcomb wrote that the film “is rooted in the new American anxiety of the time,
                    the idea that behind every ideal was a rotten, festering truth.”

Oct. 22, 23  SPOTLIGHT---USA, 2015, 129 minutes. Directed by Tom McCarthy.
                    SPEAKER: Father Paul Morrissey, O.S.A.

                    One critic commented “like the crusading journalists it honors, Spotlight forges ahead with a
                    gripping story and doesn’t stop until it gets it right.”

Nov. 5, 6      KOLYA---Czech Republic, 1996, 105 minutes.  Directed by Jan Sverak
                    SPEAKER: Boris Briker

                    This movie won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The website Spirituality
                    and Practice
advises viewers of the film to “let Kolya work its magic upon your heart.”

Nov. 12, 13  AS IT IS IN HEAVEN---Sweden, 2004, 132 minutes. Directed by Kay Pollack.
                     SPEAKER: To be announced.

                    Critic Amy Biancolli observed that this film “tells its tale of love, community, and redemption
                    with soap-operatic mood swings and a true believer’s faith in the transcendent powers of
                    music.”

 

Nov. 19, 20   MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON—USA, 1939, 129 minutes. Directed by Frank Capra.
                     SPEAKER: Derek Arnold

                     This cinematic masterpiece was banned by Hitler’s Germany, Mussolini’s Italy, Franco’s Spain,
                     and Stalin’s USSR.  Many American government officials also despised the film.

Dec. 3, 4     THE FLOWERS OF ST. FRANCIS---Italy, 1950, 98 minutes. Directed by Roberto Rosselini.
                   SPEAKER: John Paul Spiro

                   Francois Truffaut called it “the most beautiful film in the world.” Critic John Nesbit called it “a
                   small film from a self-proclaimed atheist that illustrates spiritual truths far more profoundly than
                   more widely screened spectacles.”

 

Dec. 10, 11  THE WIZARD OF OZ---USA, 1939, 101 minutes. Directed by Victor Fleming.
                     SPEAKER: George Strimel

                    Variety’s Todd McCarthy called it “a work of almost staggering iconographic, mythological,
                    creative, and simple emotional meaning.”

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

DEREK ARNOLD has been a member of the Villanova Department of Communication for twelve years.  He studied and made films as part of his Communication degree from LaSalle University.  He studies connections between persuasion and politics, and media and rhetoric, but has always been fascinated by film.

JOE ANSOLABEHERE has written and produced many animated television shows, including Rugrats, Duckman, Hey Arnold!, and Recess.  He currently develops and writes television shows for Disney, Netflix, and Amazon Studios. Joe is a recipient of the prestigious Humanitas Prize.

BORIS BRIKER teaches all levels of Russian language, Russian literature, and Russian film at Villanova and is active in the Russian Area Studies Concentration.  He has co-written a collection of humorous stories in the former Soviet Union and in the West, which has been published as Sobach’e delo (The Dog’s Affair).

COLIN BRODERICK was raised Irish Catholic in the heart of Northern Ireland.  In 1998, at the age of twenty, he moved to the Bronx to drink, work construction, and pursue his dream of becoming a writer.  For the next twenty years, as he drank himself into oblivion: there were failed marriages, car wrecks, hospitals and jail cells.  Few people who have been a slave to addiction as vicious, destructive, and unrelenting as Broderick’s have lived to tell their tale.  Orangutan is the story of an Irish drunk unlike any you’ve met before.  Broderick has written a play, Father Who, and published articles in The Irish Echo, The Irish Voice, and The New York Times.

DAN JEFFERSON, a graduate of Haverford College, is a lifelong cineaste. His love of film was nurtured by David Grossman, who headed Temple University’s Center City Campus movie house and the Philadelphia Film Forum.

HEZEKIAH LEWIS, a native Californian, has an MFA in directing from UCLA’s film school. Before that, he attended Villanova, where he received a BA in Liberal Arts and Sciences, and then received a Presidential Scholarship with which he completed a Master’s degree in Theatre.  Lewis has directed and produced films that have been recognized with both domestic and international awards.  He is an Assistant Professor in the Communication Department at Villanova.

SUSAN MACKEY-KALLIS is an Associate Professor in the Communication Department at Villanova.  She has published widely about rhetoric and film, including two highly praised books, Oliver Stone’s America: “Dreaming the Myth Outward” and The Hero and the Perennial Journey Home in American Film.

SUSAN MARCOSSIN, who works in education, is a self-taught film enthusiast. Her cameo in M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable was cut from the film but appears in the DVD version.

FRANCOIS MASSONNAT is currently finishing his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania and teaches French language, literature, and film in the French and Francophone Studies Program at Villanova.  His research focuses primarily on questions of authorship in contemporary French crime cinema.

FR. PAUL MORRISSEY, O.S.A., D. Min., is an ordained Roman Catholic priest (50 years) who has served as a chaplain in the Philadelphia Prison System from 2006 to the present.  He is the author of The Black Wall of Silence, a novel about the sexual abuse cover-up in the Catholic Church. His other works include: Let Someone Hold You: the Journey of a Hospice Priest (Crossroad 1994), which won the Christopher Award and the Catholic Press Award; “Voices From Prison and the Edge,” a quarterly journal for prisoners, their families, and others affected by crime in the Greater Philadelphia area and beyond; “Together To God: Praying the Augustinian Way,” (Liguori Publications, 2013) as well as essays and op-eds in The New York Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, National Catholic Reporter and other national media.  Fr. Morrissey’s hope is that his writings will foster a conversation on many topics, but especially today on sexuality, gender and power in order to promote healing in the Catholic Church.

JOHN PAUL SPIRO is an Assistant Professor in Villanova’s Center for Liberal Education, where he teaches courses on ancient, medieval, and renaissance thought. He is also and advisor to the Cultural Film Series. 

ELANA STARR, who was publicity director of the CFS for more than 21 years, has taught a variety of courses on film and film theory at Villanova, Rosemont College, and The University of the Arts.  Her area of interest is the representations of outsiders, especially in mainstream cinema.

GEORGE STRIMEL, a broadcasting veteran, was General Manager of Radnor Studio 21, providing professional guidance and direction and training for this community cable operation.  He also created the Suburban Cable News Channel and produced all regional and national programming and was awarded a regional Emmy for his marketing campaigns.

KATHY GOLL WILMOT, in addition to working in film production, is a licensed realtor in Pittsford, NY, and previously worked as an administrator at Pet Smart Corporate, Smart Health, and WUHF-TV Fox 31.

CHRISTOPHER J. WILMOT is currently producing, directing, and narrating a documentary film, his seventh movie. He recently had a modest acting role in a Lifetime Network film entitled Showing Roots.  Wilmot is a former elected official, having served ten years in the Monroe County (NY) Legislature.  Previous to his public service, he was a registered lobbyist for an environmental concern in Washington, D.C.  Wilmot is married to his co-producer, Kathy Goll Wilmot.

RICK WORLAND is Professor in the Department of Electronic Media and Film at Southern Methodist University.  He has published many articles dealing with American popular culture in books and scholarly journals.  His latest book is The Horror Film: An Introduction, and he is currently working on a book about films of the 1960s and 1970s.

Cultural Film Series Committee

John O'Leary, Director
Carol McKiernan, Assistant Director 
J.J. Brown, Treasurer
Tony Alfano, Director, Connelly Center

Advisors

Dan Jefferson
Dr. Joan D. Lynch
Susan Marcosson
John Paul Spiro
Rev. John P. Stack
, O.S.A.
Elana Rose Starr

Student Advisors

Anne Vincent
Justin Bullock

FOR INFORMATION

610.519.4750 
610.519.4454
John O'Leary